Spring Term Electives Course Catalog

ACA400
Gender on Screen
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Pfeffer & Brown
P2
This course will help students gain a better understanding of how ideas around gender areperpetuated and disseminated through popular culture. Using interdisciplinary approaches to visual analysis, such as historical, sociological, and theoretical, we will explore the ways in which film and television are used as tools to reinforce and critique our understandings of gender. Overall, the goal of this course is twofold: to give students a better fluency in the language of gender and to help students build a critical toolkit for analyzing the world around them, through the lens of gender. The films for this course are from the last 30 yearsin American cinema, and will include titles like Fight Club (1999), Mean Girls (2004), and Moonlight (2016). We also plan on incorporating shorter pieces, such as TV episodes and musicvideos, to help students see how visual media, in all forms, is steeped in ideas of gender. Some key questions for this course are: what defines masculinity and femininity? How are ideas of masculinity and femininity related to other aspects of identity such as race and sexual orientation? To what extent can popular culture trouble mainstream ideas of gender? How can we become more critical of the media we consume and the messages that media contains?
ACA600
Exploring Race & Racism
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chapin
P6
What is race? What is racism? How did the concept of race emerge and (how) has the understanding of what race means changed over time? What forces caused these changes? How do the forms and expressions of racism affect the lived experience of them? Are their circumstances or strategies that amplify, minimize or eliminate racism? Over nine weeks, multiple Deerfield instructors, each through the lens of a unique discipline, will explore the concepts of race and racism. Students will confront the driving forces, machinery, and consequences of racism and bigotry in the United States, and across the globe. Students will have nightly readings, engage in daily seminar discussions and regular journal writing, and develop independent projects.
ACA601
Debating Higher Education
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
J Austin
P5
American college campuses have long been sites of contention where issues facing the country are telescoped and intensified. This multidisciplinary course explores a number of contested issuesóeach with its own historical and philosophical contextóshaping college campuses today. Questions include the purpose of college; free speech, civility and the limits of debate; racial justice, reparations and the politics of historical remembrance, theethics of boycotts and divestment; debates around meritocracy, economic inequality and educational opportunity; and the social challenges facing college students today. Drawing from works of history, art history, memoir and personal narrative, education, philosophy, political science, economics, long form reportage and public argument, the course also includes a number of case studies, focusing on universities such as Yale, Georgetown, Penn State, University of Mississippi and Harvard, among others. A final unit considers how students flourish in collegeóand the threats to them doing so. The course will offer opportunities for you to reflect on your Deerfield educationóas well as opportunities to think about the years ahead. Assignments include regular, reflective journals, directed research and short essays/position papers/policy recommendations on specific case studies.
ENG630
Creative Writing Workshop
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Wright
P1 P2
Are you creative? Do you want to explore or develop your creative side in a new way? Haveyou ever wanted to try writing a story, a dramatic scene or something completely new? This course will run as a workshop intended to ignite studentsí creativity and to explore the generative part of writing. Daily in-class writing exercises will give students opportunitiesto experiment with language and structure and to expand and explore their voices as writers. Work done in class will be what sets assignments in motion. In addition to in-class writing exercises, creative exercises outside of class and discussions, students will critique each otherís writing in a constructive workshop atmosphereóthereby developing useful editorial skills that will help them improve their own writing and revision techniques. By the courseísend, students will have generated significant raw material, worked through numerous revisionsto complete a final portfolio of their work.
ENG645
Virginia Woolf
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Steim
P4
This course will focus on writings by Virginia Woolf, the great 20th-century novelist andessayist. Challenging and rewarding, Woolfís work is deeply engaged with the question of whatit means to live in the world, and the related question of how to depict life in writing. In our reading we will pay particular attention to the ways in which, in that effort to represent life, she plays with the conventions of narrative form: makes use of unique syntax,weaves together multiple narratives, scrambles chronology, and blurs the lines of genre. We will also discuss key themes of gender, memory, and individuality, and students will have an opportunity to write both critically and creatively in response to the pieces they read. We will begin by reading some of Woolfís shorter works ñ essays and short fiction ñ and we will move on to longer works, including A Room of Oneís Own and Mrs. Dalloway. Our reading of these texts will also be supplemented by secondary essays on Woolfís work, as well as by excerpts from her biography, diaries, and letters.
ENG651
The Literature of Fishing
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Ott
P4 P6
This course is an introduction to the literature of fishing and ways of thinking that arepracticed in so-called ìnaturalî places. Students will consider the natural environmentóoceans, lakes, and riversóand how it is entwined with the human race through fishing and the maritime experience. Besides the written word, we will also consider paintings, photographs, music and films. Once a week, class will be held at the Deerfield River. Students are welcome to use that class time to fish, meditate, read, or write in theirjournal. This is not a class in ìhow to fish,î and no instruction in fishing will be provided. Those inclined to fish must have their own equipment, bait, and Massachusetts fishing license (available on-line). Readings may include selections from Mark Browningís Haunted by Waters: Fly Fishing in North American Literature, Izzak Waltonís The Compleat Angler, A.A.Luceís Fishing and Thinking, Norman Macleanís A River Runs Through It, David James Duncanís The River Why, Hemingwayís The Old Man and the Sea and ìBig Two-Hearted River,î Rudyard Kiplingís Captainís Courageous, Jack Londonís The Sea-Wolf, as well as selections from William Jamesí Varieties of Religious Experience, and Herman Melvilleís Moby-Dick. Students will be expected to maintain a reading journal and to write several personal and analytical essays.
ENG652
Page to Stage
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Scandling
P5
Working to bring a playwrightís written words to life, students will read, discuss, and improvise on stage as they explore a variety of contemporary plays recently performed across the United States and create their own monologues or short scenes. The class might suit anyone wanting to write for the stage or screen, nurturing an acting interest (no experience necessary), or hoping to collaborate on creative challenges. The award-winning plays may include The Wolves by Sarah DeLappe, Ruined by Lynn Nottage, Proof by David Auburn, Topdog/Underdog by Suzan-Lori Parks, and Jerusalem by Jez Butterworth. Informal written responses will help participants document their discoveries.
ENG661
Rivers Near & Far
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Morris & T McVaugh
P3
ìEVENTUALLY, ALL THINGS MERGE INTO ONE, AND A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT.î So proclaims NormanMaclean in his story about growing up in Montana roughly a century ago, a sentiment that in many ways captures the importance of ìthe riverî in the collective identity and memories of Deerfield students. This interdisciplinary course examines various riparian environments through historical and literary lenses, and explores how a diverse range of authors have usedtheir connection to moving water as a reflection for their own lives. Students will read and emulate the works of authors who have interwoven river-oriented historical and scientific fact with personal reflection like Edward Abbey’s Desert Solitaire, Kathleen Moore’s Riverwalking, John McPhee’s Encounters with the Archdruid, Kevin Fedarko’s The Emerald Mile, and Richard Whiteís Organic Machine. Through a combination of outdoor and classroom experiences, students will develop historical research skills and gain a greater understanding of their surrounding environment. In addition to several short writing assignments, students will embark on a term-long, process-driven writing project on a river of their choosing. May be taken as HIS661.
ENG667
Ferrantes Neopolitan Quartet
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Stallings
P4 P6
We will focus this spring on reading and discussing acclaimed and mysterious Italian author Elena Ferranteís four sensational Neapolitan novels, as well as watching for comparison the recent adaptation of the first novel into an HBO miniseries. Published between2012 and 2015, My Brilliant Friend, The Story of a New Name, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, and The Story of the Lost Child together comprise a stunning and consuming contemporaryepic centered on the friendship of two female characters raised in a vibrant but impoverishedand violent post-WWII neighborhood in Naples. As we read, weíll have ample opportunity to confront ongoing cultural issues such as education, class, political stagnation, violence, and the role of women in society, all through the lens of a friendship that transcends and informs the story of a nation. Students will journal and annotate while reading, leading to papers upon the conclusion of each novel.
ENG668
Shakespeare’s Comedies
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Scandling
P4
Focused on Shakespeareís popular comedies Much Ado About Nothing and Twelfth Night, students will explore the ways the artistic and social contexts in which the plays are set can reshape the experience for readers, actors, and audiences. To bring the plays alive beyond the page, the ensemble will discuss performance choices, critique filmed productions, and improvise creative choices in staging exercises. Informal written responses will help participants document their discoveries.
ENG671
Inside Out: Climate Change
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Thomas-Adams
P3 P7
This course will use non-fiction, fiction, poetry and documentary film to establish an understanding of the origins and implications of the greatest challenge ever faced by human civilization and to explore the art, the politics and the ethics of confronting Climate Change both individually and collectively. Writing will be mostly creative responses to the reading, and as far as possible, we will exchange the classroom and the seminar table for thesurrounding fields and woods, where walking will be the forum and the catalyst for our discussions as we consider the ways in which Climate Change is beginning to question, transform and redefine even our most fundamental ideals of success, community, leadership, education — and what it means to be human. May be taken as PHI671.
ENG674
Reading & Writing Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
J Schloat
P6 P7
In this writing-focused survey course, we will cover a ìbiggest hitsî list, if you will, of the major art movements and memorable pieces from the Stone Age all the way to Postmodernism and Deconstructionism. We will use the texts Art: A Visual History by Robert Cumming and A Short Guide to Writing about Art by Sylvan Barnet. Students will write a seriesof ekphrastic poems in response to their favorite pieces; they will read and write their own art criticism, comparison, and analysis, and finally, they will read profiles of contemporaryartists and interview a student artist on campus in order to write a biography of them and their work. This interview will involve visiting them in their work space and watching them create their art.
ENG675
Broken Rules: Protest Lit.
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Steim
P5
Protest literature is, in the words of critic John Stauffer, ìthe uses of language to transform the self and change society.î In this course, students will encounter works of protest literature in the American tradition, from Thomas Paine to Frederick Douglass to Henry David Thoreau to Martin Luther King, Jr. Additionally, through a study of Standard English grammar conventions, students will also come to recognize that literature need not beovertly ìprotest literatureî to exist as a form of protest: that ìunconventionalî uses of language can highlight alternate narratives and upset traditional structures of power. Students will encounter works by Modernists Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Jean Toomer, and William Faulkner; works by 20th-century African American writers Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright; and works by contemporary writers Junot Diaz, Jamaica Kincaid, and Sherman Alexie. Students will supplement their reading with theory and criticism by HenryLouis Gates, Jr., Edward Said, John McWhorter, Steven Pinker, and Audre Lorde. This course isfor students eager to engage with the rich tradition of using literature and language to break rules; it is also for students looking to strengthen their command of Standard English grammar before heading off to college.
ART210
Videography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Trelease
P7
This course offers hands-on experience in all aspects of video production, including direction, acting, camera operation, lighting, sound, and editing. Inspiration is derived from the history of film/video along with a substantial library of previous student work. Projects are designed with artistic intent, involving a variety of genres and an emphasis on formal cinematography and creative expression. Many of the final projects are featured in Deerfieldís student video festival in the spring.
ART301
Intro to Architecture
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Payne
P1 P3
This course will introduce students to major movements and themes in architecture, significant architects and buildings throughout history, and contemporary architectural issues. Utilizing lectures, discussions, drawings, and field trips, students will develop an appreciation for architecture and become conversant with its history and vocabulary.
ART416
Advanced Architectural Design
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Architectural Design
Payne
P2
This course offers advanced work for students who have completed Architectural Design. A spring term project is selected by the class with emphasis on model building and working collaboratively. Students refine their drawing and design skills while working with the 3-D design program SketchUp.
ARTDIR
Directed Study-Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MUS220
Studio/Production
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
VanEps
P5
How is todayís music put together? What path does music take from the time it leaves the creator until it arrives in your ear . Working in the recording studio, we will learn all aspects of production. Starting with pre-production, then recording, then editing, then mixing. Students will need to do much of the homework in the studio itself. LIMITED NUMBER OFSEATS AVAILABLE
THE402
Take to the Stage!
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Hynds
P4
Is acting on your DA bucket list? Have you performed on stage yet? Hereís your chance! Inthis class, both actors and directors will collaborate to develop a small performance for an invited audience at the end of term. Students will contribute to the development of a creative ensemble and examine elements of performance. No experience is necessary.
THE407
Film Studies
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Hynds
P6 P7
This course analyzes and critiques classic and contemporary cinema from around the world.We shall examine basic elements of film production, comparative filmmaking styles and variousgenres such as Film Noir, Surrealism and Italian Neo-realism. Additionally, we study prominent international filmmakers. There is a weekly screening.
HEA401
Understanding Sexual Ethics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
A Creagh & M Brown
P5
This discussion-based class will focus on healthy relationships. It will address topics such as identity, affirmative consent, dating, ìhook-ups,î sex and sexuality. Students are expected to approach all discussions with a respectful and open attitude. Assessments for this graded course will include reflective writing and presentations. Expectations for the course are to respect othersí privacy and confidentiality. Whatís discussed in this class is to remain among the class members. There will be resources available to students if discussion triggers a past experience or prompts further research.
HIS601
Moot Court: US Constitution
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Lyons
P4 P6
In this class, students assume the role of lawyer and justices to examine, argue, and rule upon significant cases before the United States Supreme Court. From the extent of our privacy to the limits on the powers of the federal government, the Supreme Court is the arbiter of many critical issues in American society as it seeks to balance the often conflicting rights of individuals with the broader interests of society. Topics for debate include privacy issues (including gay marriage), equality under the law (including affirmative action), and freedom of speech. Assessments primarily consist of moot courts on recent or current notable cases before the Court.
HIS611
Understanding the Holocaust
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Batchelor
P1
The Nazi regime relied on long-standing strains of anti-Semitism as well as newer racial ideologies to gather support for their purposeful and highly systematic attempt to destroy the Jewish population in Europe. Beginning with an introduction to the roots of anti-Semitismin Europe, this course then explores the political, social and economic factors in Europe that made Adolf Hitlerís rise to power possible. It also examines the origins, development, and implementation of the Nazi Germanyís genocidal policies and their relationship to the Second World War. Using diaries, speeches, bureaucratic documents, memoirs, films, and historical scholarship, this course considers accounts by perpetrators, victims, survivors, bystanders and rescuers in order to wrestle with the motivations and suffering of the variouspeople involved. Finally, the course investigates the aftermath of the Holocaust and its legacies today.
HIS627
Campaigns & Elections
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Cornelius & Hamilton
P4 P5
As 21 U.S. states and territories hold presidential nominating contests between spring vacation and commencement weekend, this course will put the headlines of the news cycle in historical perspective and challenge students to think critically about the mechanics of democracy. We will explore the evolution of political parties; the role of advertising, polling, and campaign finance; and debates around suffrage, redistricting, and the electoral college. A diverse source base will inform our study, including documentaries, podcasts, narrative nonfiction, and social media, as well as primary documents and scholarly articles. The course will culminate with each student analyzing a 2020 Senate or Congressional race of their choice. In addition, class will include debates, roleplays, and roundtable discussions as we consider the past, present, and future of American party politics.
HIS661
Rivers Near & Far
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Morris & T McVaugh
P3
ìEVENTUALLY, ALL THINGS MERGE INTO ONE, AND A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT.î So proclaims NormanMaclean in his story about growing up in Montana roughly a century ago, a sentiment that in many ways captures the importance of ìthe riverî in the collective identity and memories of Deerfield students. This interdisciplinary course examines various riparian environments through historical and literary lenses, and explores how a diverse range of authors have usedtheir connection to moving water as a reflection for their own lives. Students will read and emulate the works of authors who have interwoven river-oriented historical and scientific fact with personal reflection like Edward Abbey’s Desert Solitaire, Kathleen Moore’s Riverwalking, John McPhee’s Encounters with the Archdruid, Kevin Fedarko’s The Emerald Mile, and Richard Whiteís Organic Machine. Through a combination of outdoor and classroom experiences, students will develop historical research skills and gain a greater understanding of their surrounding environment. In addition to several short writing assignments, students will embark on a term-long, process-driven writing project on a river of their choosing. May be taken as ENG661.
PSY600
Introduction to Psychology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Munkittrick
P2
Would you rather go through life unable to remember, or unable to forget? What happens toa person if they are raised alone in a locked room, with little to no human interaction – will they ever learn to speak? Can the power of the group make you disbelieve your own eyes? In this elective you will learn about psychologyís most famous (and infamous) personalities and experiments as we analyze and interpret behavior and mental processes through activities,demonstrations, and discussion. We will read peer-reviewed journal articles, watch footage from original case studies and experiments, and think critically about the work of psychologists such as Solomon Asch, Albert Bandura, Elizabeth Loftus, Stanley Milgram, PhilipZimbardo and B.F. Skinner (to name just a few). You will leave this course with a demonstrated understanding of key topics in Social, Cognitive, Behavioral, and Abnormal Psychology, while also learning about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. This class is highly participatory in nature, and you will be asked to apply the concepts we study in class to your everyday life.
CLA452
Classics Seminar
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Moseley
P4
This course will offer students with and without a background in Latin and Greek an introduction to the multifaceted study of the ancient world and the the disciplines of Classics. Through exposure to and introductory practice in various technical disciplines, students learn how scholars reconstruct and interpret the languages, literatures, and cultures (material and non-material) of the Greco-Roman world.
CLA454
Sanskrit & Indian Literature
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Houston
P5
This course is designed for students interested in the history, literature, and legacy ofancient India. Beginning with the Sanskrit languageóits rudiments, extent, and influenceówe will proceed to an in-depth study of particular sacred and secular texts composed in South Asia between 1500 BCE and 500 CE. Course objectives are: a familiarity with basic Sanskrit and Indo-European linguistics, a working knowledge of the ancient history of South Asia, and an acquaintance with the major literary products of ancient Indian civilization. We will readselectionsóin translationófrom the Vedas, Upanishads, Yoga Sutras, and the epic Mahabharata (including the Bhagavad Gita), as well as texts covering the six darsanas, or orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy. The principal theme of the course will be exposure to (and sympathy with) an ancient tradition still embraced by millions of people worldwide.
PHI601
The Bible on Broadway
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Grimm
P2
This course sets its crosshairs on Jesus Christ Superstar, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and Godspell, three of the most popular musicals from the 1970s that curiously are all biblically-based. The preeminence of these musicals seems at odds with our modern conception of the 1960-70s social climate: garlanded with anti-war protests and bucolic psychedelia, our contemporary images of what life was like back then omit the flood of teenage ìJesus Freaksî into suburban communities, mass-baptisms on the shores of the Pacific, and the centrality of Christian theology to civil rights activism. In this class, wewill read colorful primary sources, listen to cast albums, and watch movie versions of the musicals. We will ask: How did the motif of celebrity permeate from the profane world into the sacred world onstage? How were the concerns, hopes, and fantasies of the country translated to the stage and given new life in well-worn stories from Sunday school?
PHI602
Existentialism Race & Gender
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Cornelius
P5
Existentialism, a body of philosophy centered around the questions of what it means to exist, was, by and large, created by theorists all of the same race (white), nationality (European), and gender (male). Though they explored many important, fascinating topics, such as freedom, co-existing with the Other, anxiety, religion, and what it means to live authentically, this course will explore the extent to which their thought processes and conclusions may have been shrouded by the narrowness of their circumstance of belonging to the most privileged identities in Western society. After spending the first three weeks diving into the central themes of existential philosophy with the text Existentialism for Beginners, we will read and analyze excerpts from texts such as The Second Sex, Gender Trouble, Black Skin, White Masks, Between the World and Me, and others. Students will be asked to reflect frequently through discussion and writing on how they see the concepts illuminated in the text in their own lives. The course will culminate in an explorative, reflective paper in which they use the presented texts to answer what it means to exist and to live authentically. This course will be an excellent way for students to become acquaintedwith the study of philosophy and theoretical, college-level texts.
PHI605
The Philosophy of Happiness
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Kremm
P7
This course will examine a range of questions about the nature of happiness. What is happiness, and why does it matter? Is it the main thing we should pursue in life, or are there other things that are more important? Is it a kind of pleasant feeling, or is it something more “objective” than that? What assumptions about happiness are implicit in the ways that psychologists, economists, and writers of popular media measure and talk about happiness? We will consider these and other questions, engaging with historical and contemporary work from philosophers, scientists, religious thinkers, and contributors to popular media. The primary aim of the course will be to introduce you to rich traditions of philosophical thinking about happiness, and to equip you to begin thinking with some degree of rigor and discipline about questions of happiness as they arise in your own life.
PHI671
Inside Out: Climate Change
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Thomas-Adams
P3 P7
Inside Out: Coming to Terms With Climate Change. This course will use non-fiction, fiction, poetry and documentary film to establish an understanding of the origins and implications of the greatest challenge ever faced by human civilization and to explore the art, the politics and the ethics of confronting Climate Change both individually and collectively. Writing will be mostly creative responses to the reading, and as far as possible, we will exchange the classroom and the seminar table for the surrounding fields andwoods, where walking will be the forum and the catalyst for our discussions as we consider the ways in which Climate Change is beginning to question, transform and redefine even our most fundamental ideals of success, community, leadership, education — and what it means to be human. May be taken as ENG671.
BIO404
Sports Science
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Anatomy and/or Biology or department permission
Valk & Parker
P2
Sports medicine professionals specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries that happen during sporting events, athletic training, and physical activities. The study of sports medicine and sports science involves applying medical and scientific principles to sports, exercise, and the ability of the body to perform physically. These two fields are broad and can lead to many different educational and career opportunities, such as fitness instruction, coaching, scientific research, sports psychology and nutrition. The sports science class will go in depth into the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary systems, and the effects exercise/sports has on these systems.
BIODIR
Directed Study-Biology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
COM311
Programming with Roblox
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Reid
P2
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to actually create a computer game? Stop wondering, and take Programming with Roblox! Roblox is a gaming platform in which the users create all the games. We will use the Lua programming language and Roblox’s built-in tools tolearn about game design, coding, and implementation.
SCI406
Earth’s Oceans & Atmosphere
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
R Calhoun
P2 P3
This course introduces students to the ìFluid Earthî emphasizing Earthís oceans and dynamic climate. It is estimated that 75% of Americans will live on the coast by 2025 and understanding the history, ecology, physical processes, economic opportunities and environmental challenges of Earthís oceans is critical in the 21st century. The course will examine a wide variety of subjects including the immense biodiversity of ocean life, the movement of energy through currents/air circulation, plastic pollution, climate change and how those varied topics impact our planet and our lives. Only 5% of the ocean floor has been explored by humans, new discoveries are made almost daily and this course provides an opportunity to dive deep in to the critical role our planetís vast water bodies has on our lives and the future of humanity.
SCI602
Sustainable Deerfield
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Hooker
P4
Using Deerfield Academyís own sustainability action plan as a foundation, the goal of this course is to draw on prior knowledge of physical and biological sciences, as well as economics, social science, and history, to examine specific principles and methodologies related to sustainability at Deerfield Academy. In this course, students engage with local and regional sustainability projects through weekly field trips. Students will design and carry out data-driven investigations into an important sustainability topic. At the end of the spring term, students will present their findings to the larger Deerfield community.
SCIDIR
Directed Study-Science
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP