Deerfield Academy Course Catalog

Use the filters below to sort through all of Deerfield’s course offerings. Please note that Period numbers only apply to spring electives.

ACA200
The Scholar’s Craft (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The path to becoming a successful scholar can be hard to navigate alone. This course helps students recognize and practice the skills necessary to succeed in the classroom and beyond. Topics covered in the course include time management, organization, note-taking, annotation, memorization, concentration, test preparation, reading comprehension, research skills, and listening strategies. Students take this hands-on, pass/fail course, which meets three times a week, in addition to their five core subjects.
COM200
Intro Programming & Web Design
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Ms Jimenez
P3
This course is designed for anyone who is interested in learning the basics of programming with a focus on creativity and design. Students will build their own web pages, learn to program in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and develop a better understanding of what is happening behind the scenes on the websites they use every day. Creativity is encouraged and no experience is necessary.
COM300
Intro to Computer Science
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
9th grader may be eligible with permission of the instructor
In this course, students will be introduced to core concepts and principles of programming that will be applicable on different platforms and languages as students venture further into computer science. This course has been designed to equip students with a basic understanding of the world of technology, and to foster logical, step-wise, algorithmic thinking. Students will develop problem-solving skills that are relevant in their studies across the curriculum, and will become self-directed independent learners. Students considering this course should understand that, while the content and pace are less difficultthan AP Computer Science, this is a demanding course that requires significant effort. A student’s grasp of basic algebra will contribute to their success in this class.
COM500
AP Computer Science
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Concurrent Precalculus or instructor permission
This is a course for students who have a serious interest in studying computer science. In this course students learn an object-oriented approach to programming, with the emphasis being on problem solving, algorithm development, and data structures. The course is demandingand requires significant work out of class. Students are expected to take the AP Computer Science A exam upon completion of this course.
COM600
Data Structures & Algorithms
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Computer Science or the equivalent
This course follows AP Computer Science. Students study advanced topics including linked lists, trees, breadth-first and depth-first searches, and other advanced data structures and algorithms. Students also learn to manage long-term software design projects. Topics vary somewhat from year to year and student interests can help shape projects and areas of study.
COM644
Distant Reading
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Nilsson & Mr. Hussain or Ms. Gonzales & Mr. Bakker
P5 P6
“There are so many books. There is so little time,” said English professor Stephen Ramsay(and just about everyone). How can we understand the great wealth of literature if our capacity to read is so limited by time? Can we take a quantitative approach to studying literature? How might visualizations of texts–like social network graphs of the characters in Hamlet, or geographic maps of character actions in Pride and Prejudice–complement our close reading? In a digital age, we have new and different tools at our disposal to help us draw meaning from literature, and in this elective, we will experiment with some of these tools, looking at great works and at our own writing as well. Taught by teachers in both the English and Computer Science departments, this workshop-style class is built around four projects, the final two of which will be devised by the students. By the end of the spring we’ll have an understanding of some of the limits and opportunities of these new approaches, ultimately providing insight into both literature and ourselves. The class does not require any previous exposure to computer science–only curiosity, a collaborative approach to problem solving, and a willingness to try new things. May also be taken as ENG644
ENG200
Classic and Contemporary Lit
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Developing their distinctive, expressive voices as writers and clear visions as readers, ninth graders explore familiar and unfamiliar realms in literary genres drawn from sources across time and the world. In formal and informal written responses, students begin to recognize their individual styles and refine their techniques. An examination of the fundamentals of English grammar, mechanics, and punctuation complements the seminar study of literature. All ninth graders write and deliver a literary reading and participate in a poetry contest.
ENG300
Defining Literary Traditions
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Sophomore English emphasizes critical reading, focused discussions, and a variety of writing assignments connected to the study of literature derived from the British tradition. Close reading assignments and class discussions encourage students to analyze and to appreciate the elements of literature. Teachers choose core texts from works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, the Romantic poets, a 19th-century novelist, a contemporary author, and a modernplaywright. Sophomores also select, memorize, and deliver a declamation from a literary work.
ENG330
The Writer’s Craft (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Before encountering the demands of extended essays and narratives, students meet one period a week to review and reinforce essential composition skills, including questioning evidence, forming and structuring arguments, sustaining unity, varying syntactical patterns, understanding punctuation, and revising drafts. In a workshop setting, the students receive individual attention and also learn to judge their work more critically. Students take this exercise-intensive pass/fail course in addition to English 300. (Open to returning sophomoresonly – Freshman teachers identify candidates.) Must commit to both terms.
ENG500
American Dreams
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The American Dream is a familiar phrase, but what does it mean? Whose dream is it? Is there just one dream for all Americans? How has it evolved over time? Do considerations of gender, race, ethnicity, or class affect the pursuit of this dream? To gain an understanding of how the pursuit of the distinctive American Dream helped to shape the culture and literature of the United States, students examine texts from different genres and time periods. Texts may include Rebecca Harding Davis’s Life in the Iron Mills, Nella Larsen’s Passing, Horatio Alger’s Ragged Dick, and short stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and AnziaYezierska.
ENG501
American Nature
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Nature is a seemingly simple, but paradoxical word that refers both to the environment outside us and to human qualities inside us. On our journey to explore the connection betweenplace and character in America, we visit the Great Plains, the Pacific Northwest, New England, the South, Detroit and New York City with authors like Cather, Kesey, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Emerson, Dickinson, Oliver, Morrison, Whitman, Hughes, and Fitzgerald serving as our guides. Along the way, we pursue different kinds of creative and critical writing and go on monthly field trips into the natural world around Deerfield.
ENG502
American Identities
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
America is made up of a patchwork of ethnicities, races, religions, and personal experiences. As the country has grown over the past 250 years, individuals have struggled to find their personal identities in the midst of America forming its own collective cultural and political identity on the world stage. We will examine the experiences of a variety of both native and immigrant Americans as they come of age in the melting pot that is our country. How are the varied journeys writers and their characters take in forming their personal identities informed by and affected by their status as citizens of the United States? We will examine works by authors such as Nella Larsen, Jhumpa Lahiri, James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toni Morrison, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Junot Diaz, Willa Cather, ChimamandaAdichie, Sandra Cisneros, Sherman Alexie, Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes.
ENG503
American Studies
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This is an interdisciplinary course combining American Literature and honors-level UnitedStates History. The course fulfills both the junior English and History requirements, and prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in United States History. In a team-taught double period, students examine the social, economic, political, and cultural heritage of theUnited States through a combination of primary documents, interpretive secondary sources and representative works of American literature and art. Close, critical analysis, responsible oral discourse, and expository writing are emphasized. American Studies is team-taught and meets for a double period.
ENG506
American Echoes
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Carl Sagan once declared, “Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs.” What is literature, then, if not the echo of words spoken years ago? In this course we will seek to hear such echoes in the work of American authors who sought to give voice to the country they knew, thecountry they suffered for, the country they dreamed of. We will also attempt to discern in these writers the various ways their poems, stories, and plays speak not simply to the readerbut to one another as well. In addition to core texts from Fitzgerald, Whitman, and Dickinson, we will likely encounter novels from Cather, Twain, Chopin, and Kesey; poetry from Frost, Hughes, and Stevens; short stories from Poe, Walker, and London; and drama from Arthur Millerand Lorraine Hansberry.
ENG507
American Freedom
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
From Frederick Douglass to James Baldwin, from W.E.B. DuBois to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,Black authors have navigated a complex set of concerns around the meanings of Black racial identity in America. Black novelists, poets, and playwrights have utilized literature to makesense of the Black American experience, to reflect on the formation of a cohesive self in a world awash with anti-Black imagery, and to bring readers to greater knowledge about the country as a whole. These Black authors’ work provides a standpoint by which to consider not only questions of Blackness but of gender, class, ability, sexuality, and power and justice more broadly. This course will investigate these concerns through reading, writing, and talking about a wide range of material. Students will hone their skills as close readers as they attend to the nuances of our course texts, develop their analytical and creative voices while writing a series of argumentative and personal pieces including the junior declamation,and grow as seminarians while engaged in a collective search for meaning. Possible texts include works by Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W.E.B. DuBois, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Adrienne Kennedy, Audre Lorde, Maya Angelou, Lorraine Hansberry, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, August Wilson, Tennessee Williams, Colson Whitehead, Alice Walker, Octavia Butler, Ta-Nehisi Coates,and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
ENG540
American Stages
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
American writers continue to expose the tension between the conventional and unconventional impulses as individuals struggle to find their place in or apart from a largercommunity. The clashes play powerfully on the stage or screen, and by adding those genres to their exploration of the American character, students encounter the gender and economic tensions in Lynn Nottage’s Ruined, love’s deceptions in Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire, the deadening social conformity in Edith Wharton’s novel The Age of Innocence and Martin Scorsese’s film adaptation, the decadent American dreams in Francis Ford Coppola’sThe Godfather, and the battle between intolerance and redemptive love in Tony Kushner’s Angels in America.
ENG560
American Voices
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
In addition to the core texts, Gatsby, Huck Finn, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, we will also use a wide range of American short stories and novels to sample the many voices and issues that have populated American literature. Students will encounter writers ranging from Edith Wharton and Nathaniel Hawthorne in the 19th century to Ernest Hemingway, John Updike and Toni Morrison in the 20th. The variety of story styles and ideas helps students to understand better how literature has changed over time and to hone their analytical skills bydiscussing how the stories work. The purpose of the course is to provide a breadth of exposure as well as a chance to sample modern literature.
ENG610
Future Shock: Contemp. Lit.
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The ground-breaking “dystopian” novels of the 20th Century, such as Orwell’s 1984, Huxley’s Brave New World and Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, have produced an extraordinary andgrowing body of literature that imagines future worlds shaped by current trends, for better and worse. What kind of societies will cyberspace, genetic engineering, emerging technologies, climate change, terrorism, population growth and resource wars produce? What will be the fate of the institutions and ideals that presently define us? What will happen to our fundamental notions of liberty, the individual, and human relationships? Will human beings flourish or fail? This course will examine these questions through several of the finest recent literary dystopias and will approach the reading in a primarily seminar-style, discussion format. Writing assignments will be predominantly creative responses to the reading, with an occasional foray into relevant essays, short stories and films. Possible texts include Cloud Atlas, by David Mitchell; Oryx and Crake, by Margaret Atwood; The Road, by Cormac McCarthy; The Dazzle of Day, by Molly Gloss; Fiskadoro, by Denis Johnson; Riddley Walker, by Russell Hoban.
ENG612
Public Speaking
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Dr. Wright
P2 P3
Have you ever wondered what makes a great speech or why some people seem to be at ease speaking in public while others stumble through it? In this course students learn the art of effective speechmaking by studying both effective and ineffective oratory models. Students also write and deliver speeches that address a variety of intended audiences and situations in order to gain the knowledge and experience needed to become a confident public speaker.
ENG614
Existentialism: Live Dangerous
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mrs. O’Donnell & Mr. O’Donnell
P2 P7
One of the most interesting philosophical and literary movements of the last 150 years, Existentialism confronts the challenges of everyday human existence. Close reading, formal and informal writing, collaborative projects and lively discussion facilitated by a teaching team grapple with the problems of identity, personal responsibility, freedom, faith, and meaning in face of the absurdity of existence. In addition to the most prominent figures—Sartre, Camus, de Beauvoir, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard—an international cohort of writers may include Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Melville, Hawthorne, Kafka, Unamuno, and Tillich. A nod to the great pre-existentialist, Plato, establishes a foundation for our multicultural and cross-disciplinary perspectives and productions. May also be taken as PHI614
ENG615
City Lights
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
City lights have been beckoning men and women for millennia. Freed from cultivating the land and in search of opportunity, more than 50 percent of the world’s population live in cities today, and there is no end to this trend nor to the city’s central role in our experience of modernity. The literature and critical questions of this seminar will grow fromthe character of cities, both as geographical location and cultural production, as it is and has been both represented by thinkers and authors through time and featured in each of our own experiences. Some familiar and not so familiar authors will guide us through the streets of New York (Teju Cole, Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Malcolm X, Alfred Kazin, E.B. White) to which we will compare and contrast Shakespeare’s London and contextualized Venice, crossroads of east and west, in his controversial The Merchant of Venice. We will make a field trip to Lower Manhattan before the course returns to London in works by such diverse authors as Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, William Blake, Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot. In early winter, we travel to the French countryside to deepen the course’s theoretical perspective byimagining with Gustave Flaubert’s Emma Bovary the poignantly nicknamed “City of Lights” itself: Paris. This course begins with an extended, intensive focus on various forms of expressive writing. Short nonfiction and fiction readings will serve as models, but the emphasis will be on the writing process.
ENG621
Literature and Form
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course investigates the evolution of literary forms through two questions: what is the relationship between old and new? And what is the influence of form on meaning? In broad strokes that follow the arc of time while touching down on seminal texts, we will begin with vibrant contemporary poetry and prose and then cast ourselves far back in time, looking at early forms of storytelling and communication, following the transition from oral to literateculture, investigating the development of increasingly varied and complex forms, and then immersing ourselves in the boundary-breaking inventiveness of the 20th century–all before reconsidering the chaotic present in the context of the past. In each era we will ask: how does the memory of the past inform the vision of the future? Students will write critically and creatively, pairing formal analyses with the ir own experimental prose and verse. Readings will partner classic literature with contemporary writers. Texts will include poetryby Eliot, Dickinson, Pound, Whitman, and folk poets of Greece and Afghanistan; drama by Sophocles, Shakespeare, and Stoppard; novels by Calvino, Woolf, and others; works in translation; and readings by Gleick, Pinker, Tolkein, Emerson, and Moretti.
ENG622
Jazz Age and Lost Generation
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Paris, Harlem, Greenwich Village: Why were these places such powerful magnets for a generation of writers, artists, and musicians? Students will discover how a diverse range of Americans at home and abroad responded to the cultural climate of the 1920s, a decade characterized by enormous artistic upheaval in the midst of a balloon of economic prosperity.Special attention will be paid to the space Paris, Harlem, and Greenwich Village occupied in the cultural imagination of the 1920s. Students will not only study literature but also how jazz has shaped modernism in American poetry and fiction. Among the writers students will encounter will be James Joyce, Sherwood Anderson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, William Faulkner, Claude McKay, Gertrude Stein, and Jean Toomer. Writing assignments will include personal and analytical essays, as well as creative pieces inspired by modernist models.
ENG624
Love Stories
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
From the time we are children, we are bombarded with love stories—in songs, in films, andin advertisements—so that most of us, male and female alike, have an idea of what it means tofall in love even before it happens. We have absorbed the patterns and tropes, yet so many ofthe great love stories of world literature defy these. While we assume love is eternal, it isalso deeply cultural and ideological. Artists, poets, philosophers, theologians, psychologists, all have fought through time to establish their definitive take on the subject. This course will tackle the most provocative treaties, drama, verse and narratives written about love and friendship. We will begin with Plato’s Symposium that gave us the notion of Platonic Love and a few representative tales from the courtly romantic tradition of medieval France that introduced and shaped notions of romantic love. We will then be prepared to critique and analyze the theme from the early-modern in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice and beyond in works such as Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita and throughout Jeffrey Eugenides’ wonderfully selected stories in My Mistresses Sparrow is Dead: Great Love Stories from Chekov to Munro. You will sharpen your careful reading and critical analysis through regular informal and formal writing. The senior meditation will develop by way of The New York Times weekly Modern Love column and other timely prose models.
ENG625
Central Questions
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
When Hamlet asks, “To be, or not to be? That is the question,” he utters what has become,unfortunately, a cliché. In the context of Shakespeare’s play, however, this question rippleswith Hamlet’s anxiety, with his wondering as to how (or whether) he should move forward with his life. This course will explore works, like Hamlet, characterized by protagonists who grapple with similar “central questions,” questions like: What defines me? What does it mean to be a good daughter/son? To what extent has my family, race, gender, and/or choices determined my future? To what extent do I have the power to make my own choices at all? How do people see me? Which path should I take? These questions are visceral and real to the characters we will encounter; yet, the asking of big questions is not (or certainly shouldn’tbe) something done only by fictional characters. To that end, at the same time that the classwill be analyzing these figures and their defining questions, students will be keeping journals in which they will log their day-to-day experiences. In the winter, as students approach the writing of their meditations, each will read his/her own journal as a text, and,in so doing, isolate the questions that emerge as central in their own lives. This course is designed to exercise the skills of analysis, critical thinking, and writing, as well as the practice of regular self-reflection. Texts may include White Teeth by Zadie Smith, Hamlet by William Shakespeare, Maus by Art Spieg
ENG627
Gunslinger Nation
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Schloat
P6
When the frontier of American expansion crossed the Mississippi River into the vast expanses of the American West, the story of a young nation’s rapid maturation changed foreverand with it came a new version of literary hero: the gunslinger. Outlaws and lawmen, cattle rustlers and Indian hunters, vigilantes and mercenaries, popular American literature for the last hundred years teems with gun-toting, devil-may-care characters who shrug off horrible violence as they range across the western territories. This course will explore a range of examples of frontier fiction focused on themes of justice, violence, and morality, as well astrack the evolution of the rebellious gunslinger archetype into contemporary literature and popular culture. Balancing exquisite prose that describes stunning western landscapes with moments of sudden violence and surprising redemption, this body of fiction laid the groundwork for many of the storytelling conventions that arose in cinema and television in the middle of the last century. We will encounter writers such as Cormac McCarthy, Zane Grey,Robert Olmstead, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Steven King, Larry McMurtry, Annie Proulx, and Louise Erdich.
ENG629
Writing Wild
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Thomas-Adams
P2 P3
What do we mean when we say “Nature”? Is Humanity’s destiny to conquer and transcend our origins in Nature, or are the answers to our happiness and survival to be found in the natural world? Making use of both the seminar table and the surrounding fields and woods as our classroom, this course will explore Humanity’s fraught and complex relationship with the Earth and the living beings who share it with us through a variety of approaches, from close reading of fiction, essays and poetry, to creative writing and discussion, to weekly forays into the outdoors. Expect varied, substantial reading, frequent short creative and AP-style writing assignments, and plenty of time outside in every kind of weather.
ENG631
Mystery, Madness, and Lies
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course will examine the importance of narrators to fiction. We will consider the function of the narrator as fundamental to how a reader interprets a text. What happens when an author intentionally includes an untrustworthy, unreliable and even unstable narrator? What about a narrator who only knows part of a story but tells it anyhow? How much does who is telling the story influence how the story is described or expressed? Through reading textswith different types of narrators, we will explore these and other questions to gain an understanding of how narrative form complicates the meaning of the text as a whole. The goal of the course is for every student to make the transition from talking about what a text saysor what happens to making interpretive arguments about how a text works and what its meaningsare. Students will also develop a vocabulary for discussing, analyzing and writing about narrative form. Authors may include Chris Bohjalian, Agatha Christie, Patricia Highsmith, Henry James, Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf and others.
ENG634
Telling True Stories
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course begins with an extended, intensive focus on various forms of nonfiction writing. Students will study contemporary longform journalism from magazines, newspapers, andthe web, both as samples of effective prose models and as guides to instruct them in the reporting and researching processes for nonfiction writing. In addition to studying and refining their own writing process, students will learn and practice interviewing and researching skills as they compose their own pieces of general nonfiction. Frequent, shorter reading assignments will include work by John McPhee, Malcolm Gladwell, Joan Didion, Gay Talese, and Ian Frazier, in addition to readings exploring the evolving debate about nonfiction writing as art, journalism, or both. Over the Winter Long Weekend, students will travel together to a domestic location to gather information about a topic of their choice inpreparation for a final project to be completed in February. As a group, the class will plan this trip throughout the course and collaborate on the reporting, research, and writing of a true story about a particular American community.
ENG636
The Deerfield Almanac
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Ms Steim
P7
Almanac: “A handbook, typically published annually, frequently presenting a chronologicalaccount of recent events, and containing information and statistics of general interest or ona particular subject” (OED). The shared work of this spring elective will be that of compiling a Deerfield almanac: a handbook of observations, accounts, anecdotes, and other bits of news pertaining to our day-to-day life at the Academy and in this historic town. We will take daily log of the moon and weather, study and make maps of the campus and surrounding area, and take field trips and other excursions to destinations both known and new. Our vision of our world will be supplemented by readings related to Deerfield: The Headmaster, and excerpts from The Deerfield Reader, New England Outpost: War and Society in Colonial Deerfield, and Massachusetts: A Guide to its Places and People, among other works. We will also make use of the Academy’s archives. By the end of the spring, we will have created in our almanac an artifact: a window into the world of Deerfield in this particular, fleeting moment in time (that is, the spring of 2017). We will be, in this sense, reporters for posterity. This course offers an opportunity for students – seniors in particular – to pause, investigate, and discover (or rediscover) this place before they leave and move on to their next adventure.
ENG642
The Great American Poem
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Stallings
P1 P4
The critic Eliot Weinberger contends that the history of American poetry is the history of a series of great poems, each of which permanently altered the landscape of poetry. But you won’t find the Great American Poem in the mall beside the Great American Cookie, so it’s reasonable to wonder- which were those poems? What were the conditions that made them possible? Why haven’t more of us read them? What makes something “great” anyhow? And where would we look if we wanted to find the Great American Poems(s) of our own time? After establishing our footing in the first four questions by looking at the historical record, we’ll address the final question, investigating the poetry of our time via suggestions from contemporary poets and critics. On the way to developing an individual understanding of what separates great poetry from ordinary and excellent poetry, students will read widely and variously, write critically and creatively, and maintain a reading journal. The term will culminate with a presentation of findings.
ENG644
Distant Reading
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Nilsson & Mr. Hussain or Ms. Gonzales & Mr. Bakker
P5 P6
“There are so many books. There is so little time,” said English professor Stephen Ramsay(and just about everyone). How can we understand the great wealth of literature if our capacity to read is so limited by time? Can we take a quantitative approach to studying literature? How might visualizations of texts–like social network graphs of the characters in Hamlet, or geographic maps of character actions in Pride and Prejudice–complement our close reading? In a digital age, we have new and different tools at our disposal to help us draw meaning from literature, and in this elective, we will experiment with some of these tools, looking at great works and at our own writing as well. Taught by teachers in both the English and Computer Science departments, this workshop-style class is built around four projects, the final two of which will be devised by the students. By the end of the spring we’ll have an understanding of some of the limits and opportunities of these new approaches, ultimately providing insight into both literature and ourselves. The class does not require any previous exposure to computer science–only curiosity, a collaborative approach to problem solving, and a willingness to try new things. May also be taken as COM644
ENG645
Virginia Woolf
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Ms. Steim
P5
This course will focus on writings by Virginia Woolf, the great 20th-century novelist andessayist. Challenging and rewarding, Woolf’s work is deeply engaged with the question of whatit means to live in the world, and the related question of how to depict life in writing. In our reading we will pay particular attention to the ways in which, in that effort to represent life, she plays with the conventions of narrative form: makes use of unique syntax,weaves together multiple narratives, scrambles chronology, and blurs the lines of genre. We will also discuss key themes of gender, memory, and individuality, and students will have an opportunity to write both critically and creatively in response to the pieces they read. We will begin by reading some of Woolf’s shorter works – essays and short fiction – and we will move on to longer fiction, which may include Mrs. Dalloway and To The Lighthouse. Our readingof these texts may also be supplemented by secondary essays on Woolf’s work, as well as by excerpts from her biography, diaries, and letters.
ENG646
Reading the World
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Ms. Liske
P3 P4
In the first half of the term, we’ll take up works by Ta-Nahesi Coates, Zadie Smith, James Baldwin, Rebecca Solnit, Warsan Shire, Beyoncé, Ayad Ahktar—we’ll watch and read and listen—choosing, as we go, a subsequent set of texts such that, turning the corner into the second half of the term, we’ll have charted a new path to follow deeper into unfamiliar territory. That is, we’ll choose together our syllabus for the second half of the term. The goal of the course will be to encounter the familiar, the unfamiliar, uncover our own cultural blind spots, build a shared understanding of what we as a team are finding, and to write about the experience in a myriad of ways. The class goal will be to curate a collectionof our writing from the term (self-published), so that we walk away into the summer with a screenshot clutch of where our minds have been in Spring 2017.
ENG647
Hemingway’s Short Fiction
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Ott
P2
At times racist, sexist, xenophobic, and a bully, Hemingway was, at the same time, an artist of great delicacy and nuance, deeply attuned to the beauty of the natural world, the tensions between the sexes, and the socio-political challenges of a world that was broken by World War I. Rather than being a celebration, this class seeks to provide a lens to understanding how Hemingway’s life and work represent essential tensions in the promise of the American experience. Indeed, the promise of the American goals of inclusion, tolerance, and equality continue to evolve in a challenging culture of exclusion, intolerance, and discrimination. For this reason, it is important for students to understand how Hemingway represents all that is ugly and beautiful in the American experience. Students will read Hemingway’s short stories and write a series of response essays.
ENG648
Shakespeare Anew
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Shakespeare’s plays have been read, performed, and adapted for 400 years, and in each case, the original words and intentions have taken on new possibilities as their contexts have changed. Modern viewers might, for example, recognize Richard III and the Macbeths in House of Cards or Kate and Petruchio in Ten Things I Hate About You. Students will encounter the original plays The Tempest, The Winter’s Tale, and Hamlet as preludes to their modern adaptions in Margaret Atwood’s Hag-Seed, Jeanette Winterson’s The Gap of Time and Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, respectively. Honing critical reading and writing techniques, the participants attempt to view and explore the plays and adaptions as actors, readers, and audience members through seminar discussions, essays, staging exercises,and improvisations. The course ends with the senior meditation.
ENG649
Poetry Now: American Women
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
In this poetry writing and reading class, students will engage with poetry as it exists in the world today, specifically as it is written and influenced by women. Our reading materials, intended as points of inspiration for original poetry, will be drawn from a contemporary collection of individual volumes of poetry written by American women from the Pioneer Valley, the Northeast, and throughout the United States. Through reading, discussion,and especially through imaginative creative work, the class will arrive at an understanding of the many ways in which poets are, in the present, transforming the poetic art. When possible, we will communicate directly with the poets whose work we are reading, taking the opportunity to ask questions and learn what makes poetry exciting for poets who are living and writing today. Students will have the opportunity, as well, to write, share, and discuss their own poetry. By the end of the term, students should be confident readers of contemporary poetry in print and on the internet, prepared to engage actively in the ongoing conversation that surrounds the art.
ENG650
The Empire Writes Back
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
In this course our concern will be the literature of postcolonialism (all that’s written after the colonizing force has gone home). In his poem “Conqueror,” W.S. Merwin frames many of our questions, albeit without that mark of punctuation: “when they start to use your language/ do they say what you say/ who are they in your words/ …do you know who is praying/ for you not to be there.” In addition to taking up the questions we hear Merwin asking—What does it feel like to be the conquered? the one in power? How do you know the answers to thosetwo questions? What happens when the conquerors finally go away? Can they ever leave?—we’ll also frame our own questions and engage critical theorists to give us a new language to contain new ideas. Our path through the crowded landscape of writers concerned with postcolonialist questions will be necessarily circuitous (geographically, temporally)—and varied when it comes to genre: we’ll read essays, novels, poems, plays, and we’ll take in a few films that amplify the postcolonial issues we’re exploring. In the Fall term we’ll focus on literature of post-Independence India, writers from home and abroad (which is which?). In the Winter term we’ll cast a wider net to include writers from other former British colonies:the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria. We’ll turn also to Americans’ literary presence in a postcolonial world. Our writing will span the spectrum: journal work, personal narrative, critical essay, poetry.
ART100
Intro to Studio Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mrs. Taylor
P3
This course is intended to be a first experience in the visual arts. It prepares studentsfor AP Studio Art by introducing the fundamentals of drawing and painting – line, form, composition, and color – through a variety of assignments involving the still life, perspective, and interior spaces. A brief survey into 19th and 20th century art is included.
ART201
Photography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course offers an opportunity to investigate the formal elements of both digital and film photography, while exploring the potential for creative expression and visual narrative.Students study and experiment with the nomenclature of DSLR cameras and advanced computer software, as well as film cameras and darkroom printing. Projects take inspiration from greatphotographers of the past and present to foster intentionality with design and content. The course concludes with the assemblage of a digital and printed portfolio.
ART210
Videography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course offers hands-on experience in all aspects of video production, including direction, acting, camera operation, lighting, sound, and editing. Inspiration is derived from the history of film/video along with a substantial library of previous student work. Projects are designed with artistic intent, involving a variety of genres and an emphasis on formal cinematography and creative expression. Many of the final projects are featured in Deerfield’s student video festival in the spring.
ART243
3-D Visual Design
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Projects in this course are focused on experiencing the iterative process, which developsa solution gradually by learning from and refining multiple iterations of a design. Students will learn the essential elements and principles of design using a variety of tools, including drawing and building both digital and physical models. An emphasis of the class will be designing and building in 3-D and all projects will conclude with a verbal and written critique.
ART300
Design for Human Impact
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Whether presenting operating instructions, safety information, statistics, advertisements, or legal arguments, graphics often serve a critical role in guiding-—and responding to—-human needs and behaviors. In this course, students will learn a Design Thinking process that first considers human factors and then provides the critical tools and techniques neededto develop impactful solutions. Students will use Design Thinking and graphics to solve real-world problems ranging from the merely inconvenient to the truly life-threatening.
ART301
Intro to Architecture
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Payne
P2 P3
This course will introduce students to major movements and themes in architecture, significant architects and buildings throughout history, and contemporary architectural issues. Utilizing lectures, discussions, drawings, and field trips, students will develop an appreciation for architecture and become conversant with its history and vocabulary.
ART304
Designing Everyday Things
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Thiel
P7
Whether it’s a toothbrush or a toaster oven, great thought goes into the design of everyday things. In this class, we’ll tear down familiar objects to uncover their form and function; we’ll explore the design constraints that come from material selection, manufacturing capability, and market forces; and we’ll discuss the cultural impact these common, everyday items. Through this lens of industrial design and material culture, we’ll learn the basics of design thinking and then launch our own work in prototyping improvements and new ideas. This is a hands on class where students will directly grapple with design processes and decisions.
ART305
Words & Pictures
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Wiemer
P1
From the Lascaux Cave paintings and the Bayeux Tapestry to Doonesbury and Doctor Strange,comic and sequential art has been an important, influential, and at times controversial medium. This course will explore the history of this art form and its influences on history, popular culture, politics, and social issues. Students will view and read a variety of examples of this art form and works they have influenced. As a culminating experience, students will have the opportunity to create their own piece of comic and sequential art. This course will be taught in a blended learning format. Classes will meet face-to-face two periods a week, while the remaining classes will meet online through Canvas and other online resources.
ART402
Experimental Photography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Photography (ART201) or the equivalent
Mr. Trelease
P7
This course will utilize an array of photographic equipment, including digital and analogcameras, and the wet darkroom. We will study great innovations in photographic processes, from the 19th to 21st century, and experiment with platinum-palladium, cyanotype, and silver printing. We will use 35 mm, Holga, and large format film cameras, and integrate state-of-the-art digital technology for our creative pursuits.
ART404
The City as a Work of Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mrs. Sherburne & Mr. Payne
P5
Combining elements of history with art and design, students will examine the characteristic elements of historical urban form, to explain their presence and meaning, and to examine the ways in which they were modified over time and space. The physical form of theurban environment in diverse locations (both built and unbuilt) will be studied from social, economic, political, and design perspectives. May also be taken as HIS404.
ART412
Art of Architectural Drawing
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Drawing is the primary method by which architects communicate their design ideas, but thedrawings themselves are frequently overlooked as works of art. Principles and elements of two-dimensional architectural representation are taught using both traditional and digital media. Projects range from drawing traditional architectural views (plan, section and elevation) by hand and with AutoCad to rendering drawings using colored pencils and watercolors.
ART415
Architectural Design
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Students receive instruction in architectural design, drafting, planning, and materials and construction methods. Plan, section and elevation drawings are produced as well as study and final models. Students will design a range of buildings and spaces, including residentialand civic projects. Studio work is supplemented with readings in the history and theory of architecture.
ART416
Advanced Architectural Design
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Architectural Design
Mr. Payne
P7
This course offers advanced work for students who have completed Architectural Design. A spring term project is selected by the class with emphasis on model building and working collaboratively. Students refine their drawing and design skills while working with the 3-D design program SketchUp.
ART500
AP Art History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Exploring history through works of art offers an approach for understanding our global community and is an effective way to review significant events from a visual perspective. From prehistory to the present, artworks are examined in the context of their era’s dominant ideas, political events, economic factors, and social structure. This approach, guided by theredesigned AP art history curriculum, examines exemplars of global artistic traditions withinten content areas. Visual literacy, critical assessment, analytical reading, class discussions, and written expression will enable students to decode art, learn from it, and appreciate the extraordinary creativity of people throughout history. The decision to take the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the instructor.
ART510
AP Studio Art (Photography)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The one-term Photography course is recommended
This course expands on the one-term Photography course, with continued emphasis on the history of photography, the formal elements and principles of design, and creative storytelling with the camera. Students work to build a portfolio of images with a range of subject matter, levels of abstraction, varying points of view, depth of field, color, and lighting. Digital and film cameras will be employed, along with a vast array of printing processes. The class routinely takes field trips to a myriad of locales around the northeast.The course concludes with the submission of an A.P. portfolio to the College Board in the spring. May be taken as a 6th course: ART510P – (p/f)
ART510P
AP Studio Art (Photo) (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The one-term Photography course is recommended
This course expands on the one-term Photography course, with continued emphasis on the history of photography, the formal elements and principles of design, and creative storytelling with the camera. Students work to build a portfolio of images with a range of subject matter, levels of abstraction, varying points of view, depth of field, color, and lighting. Digital and film cameras will be employed, along with a vast array of printing processes. The class routinely takes field trips to a myriad of locales around the northeast.The course concludes with the submission of an A.P. portfolio to the College Board in the spring.
ART520
AP Studio Art – Drawing
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission
This course involves concentrated study in drawing and follows the Advanced Placement syllabus. scaThe fall begins with a review of fundamental technique and includes design principles, creative process, historical perspectives and contemporary trends. Each student is expected to do outside reading and studio work and to prepare an AP portfolio during the spring term. All students are required to submit the eventual portfolio. Students assume a photographic lab fee of $60 towards the preparation of their portfolio. The decision to take the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the instructor. May be taken as 6th course: ART520P-(p/f)
ART520P
AP Studio Art – Drawing (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission
This course involves concentrated study in drawing and follows the Advanced Placement syllabus. scaThe fall begins with a review of fundamental technique and includes design principles, creative process, historical perspectives and contemporary trends. Each student is expected to do outside reading and studio work and to prepare an AP portfolio during the spring term. All students are required to submit the eventual portfolio. Students assume a photographic lab fee of $60 towards the preparation of their portfolio. The decision to take the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the instructor.
ART530
AP Studio Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission
Similar to AP Drawing, this course also includes work with color, painting, and sculpture. Students will study contemporary trends in Western Art and participate in field trips to museums. Students assume a photographic lab fee of $60 towards the preparation of their portfolio. The decision to take the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the instructor. May be taken as 6th course: ART530P – (p/f)
ART530P
AP Studio Art (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission
Similar to AP Drawing, this course also includes work with color, painting, and sculpture. Students will study contemporary trends in Western Art and participate in field trips to museums. Students assume a photographic lab fee of $60 towards the preparation of their portfolio. The decision to take the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the instructor. May be taken as 6th course: ART530P – (p/f)
ART600
Topics: Post AP Studio Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is intended for the student who desires to pursue visual art beyond the Advanced Placement studio art syllabus. The major focus is on studio work: drawing, painting and sculpting in the style of a number of contemporary artists. Students gain a broader perspective through slide lectures from visiting artists, field trips and films. From Brunelleschi’s principles of linear perspective, to the palette of Monet’s haystacks, to Christo’s wrapped coast, students discuss the importance of self-expression, and moments of inspiration. “All the really good ideas I ever had came to me while I was milking a cow.” (Grant Wood). May be taken as 6th course: ART600P-(p/f).
ART600P
Topics: Post AP Studio (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is intended for the student who desires to pursue visual art beyond the Advanced Placement studio art syllabus. The major focus is on studio work: drawing, painting and sculpting in the style of a number of contemporary artists. Students gain a broader perspective through slide lectures from visiting artists, field trips and films. From Brunelleschi’s principles of linear perspective, to the palette of Monet’s haystacks, to Christo’s wrapped coast, students discuss the importance of self-expression, and moments of inspiration. “All the really good ideas I ever had came to me while I was milking a cow.” (Grant Wood).
ART601
Topics: Post AP Photography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Studio Art (Photography)
This course is designed for students who have completed an AP portfolio, and wish to further pursue a serious interest in photography. Personalized projects, involving self-selected themes, may be devised by each student. Digital and film cameras, and a varietyof printing processes may be employed. Class field trips will provide an opportunity to diversify source material. Students may also assist with curating and implementing exhibitions on campus, featuring work by professional photographers. The assemblage of an artportfolio, to include as a supplement with college applications, is an option to pursue in this course. May be taken as 6th course: ART610P-(p/f).
ART601P
Topics: Post AP Photo (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Studio Art – Photography
This course is designed for students who have completed an AP portfolio, and wish to further pursue a serious interest in photography. Personalized projects, involving self-selected themes, may be devised by each student. Digital and film cameras, and a varietyof printing processes may be employed. Class field trips will provide an opportunity to diversify source material. Students may also assist with curating and implementing exhibitions on campus, featuring work by professional photographers. The assemblage of an artportfolio, to include as a supplement with college applications, is an option to pursue in this course.
ART700
Topics Tutorial (Post AP)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Drawing/Studio and Topics in Contemporary Art
This advanced course is for students who have exhausted the drawing/painting curriculum including the AP level and “Topics in Contemporary Art”. Students will pursue a theme and prepare work for a group show to be installed in the school gallery during late winter term. May be taken as 6th course: ART700P-(p/f)
ART700P
Topics Tutorial (Post AP)(p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Drawing/Studio and Topics in Contemporary Art
This advanced course is for students who have exhausted the drawing/painting curriculum including the AP level and “Topics in Contemporary Art”. Students will pursue a theme and prepare work for a group show to be installed in the school gallery during late winter term.
DAN100
Intro to Dance
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is intended to be a first experience in dance. Elementary level boys and girls study a variety of dance forms such as contemporary, modern, jazz, ballet and hip-hop. This course also addresses the creative aspect of making dances through improvisation and choreography. There is an emphasis on injury prevention for athletes. Students who sign up for this course are encouraged to continue into Dance I winter and spring terms. May be takenas 6th course: DA100P-(p/f)
DAN100P
Intro to Dance (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is intended to be a first experience in dance. Elementary level boys and girls study a variety of dance forms such as contemporary, modern, jazz, ballet and hip-hop. This course also addresses the creative aspect of making dances through improvisation and choreography. There is an emphasis on injury prevention for athletes. Students who sign up for this course are encouraged to continue into Dance I winter and spring terms.
DAN200
Dance I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is intended to be a continuation of the material covered in the introductory level dance class offered fall term. However, all elementary level students may sign up for this course either for one (winter only), or two terms (winter & spring). Students enrolled in this course may have the opportunity to perform in school dance concerts. NO PREVIOUS DANCE EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. May be taken as 6th course: DAN200P-(p/f).
DAN200P
Dance I (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is intended to be a continuation of the material covered in the introductory level dance class offered fall term. However, all elementary level students may sign up for this course either for one (winter only), or two terms (winter & spring). Students enrolled in this course may have the opportunity to perform in school dance concerts. NO PREVIOUS DANCE EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY.
DAN300
Dance II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This intermediate level course continues the study of the dance techniques and choreography covered in Dance I. Students enrolled in this course may perform in and choreograph for dance concerts each term. They also have the opportunity to work with a professional choreographer for the Spring Dance Concert. This course may be taken for the full year, or as a two term class in the fall and winter. May be taken as 6th course: DAN300P-(p/f)
DAN300P
Dance II (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This intermediate level course continues the study of the dance techniques and choreography covered in Dance I. Students enrolled in this course may perform in and choreograph for dance concerts each term. They also have the opportunity to work with a professional choreographer for the Spring Dance Concert. This course may be taken for the full year, or as a two term class in the fall and winter.
DAN400
Dance III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is geared towards the serious student of dance and is designed to meet individual needs. Upper level intermediate dancers will train in a variety of techniques including contemporary, modern, jazz, ballet and hip-hop. They’ll have the opportunity to choreograph a dance collaboratively for our Student Choreography Showcase in the winter, and rehearse a dance with a professional choreographer for our Spring Dance Concert. Students cansign up either the full year, or two terms (fall and winter). May be taken as 6th course: DAN400P-(p/f).
DAN400P
Dance III (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is geared towards the serious student of dance and is designed to meet individual needs. Upper level intermediate dancers will train in a variety of techniques including contemporary, modern, jazz, ballet and hip-hop. They’ll have the opportunity to choreograph a dance collaboratively for our Student Choreography Showcase in the winter, and rehearse a dance with a professional choreographer for our Spring Dance Concert. Students cansign up either the full year, or two terms (fall and winter).
DAN500
Adv. Dance Ensemble
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is appropriate for dancers who are proficient in the techniques offered through the program. Advanced dancers explore the craft of group choreography as well as the art of the solo. Student work is showcased in all of our dance concerts, and there are also opportunities to work with guest choreographers throughout the year. May be taken as 6th course: DAN500P-(p/f).
DAN500P
Adv. Dance Ensemble (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is appropriate for dancers who are proficient in the techniques offered through the program. Advanced dancers explore the craft of group choreography as well as the art of the solo. Student work is showcased in all of our dance concerts, and there are also opportunities to work with guest choreographers throughout the year.
DAN600
Advanced Dance Tutorial
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Adv. Dance Ensemble
This class is tailored to meet the individual needs of the pre-professional dancer. Students work closely with the dance faculty to hone their technique, and create solo and group choreography for our performances. May also be taken as 6th course: DAN600P-(p/f).
DAN600P
Advanced Dance Tutorial (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Adv. Dance Ensemble
This class is tailored to meet the individual needs of the pre-professional dancer. Students work closely with the dance faculty to hone their technique, and create solo and group choreography for our performances.
MUS200
Fundamentals of Music/Studio
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Music can be defined as “organized noise”. Working in the classroom and recording studio we will listen and analyze music in a whole new way. EDM , Hip Hop, Rap, Rock, Jazz, Classical, Early Music, and World music will all be discussed. In class presentations, learning and using terminology will be stressed.
MUS210
Composition: Songwriting
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Working in a recording environment we will listen and analyze music to gain an understanding of its parts, and compositional devices. Using this information we will composemusic, starting with the basics and moving towards a complete song or instrumental composition
MUS220
Studio/Production
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr VanEps
P7
How is today’s music put together? What path does music take from the time it leaves the creator untill it arrives in your ear . Working in the recording studio, we will learn all aspects of production. Starting with pre-production, then recording, then editing, then mixing. Students will need to do much of the homework in the studio itself.
MUS300
Chorus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Singing builds community, commitment, self-discipline, personal ownership, and responsibility to the group. Open to anyone, and focused on singing, this course will introduce and develop skills in interpreting musical notation and understanding of melody, harmony, rhythm, and aesthetics. Students will develop proper singing technique and healthy habits relating to body alignment, breath management, vowel formation, proper resonation, clear diction, and accurate intonation. Classroom activities include sight-singing, light calisthenics, breathing exercises, meditation, historical research, music games, and improvisation. The ensemble will study and perform a wide range of musical styles and genres,including regularly dividing into separate Soprano/Alto and Tenor/Bass groups. Evaluations will be based on performance and growth across each term. May be taken as 6th course: MUS300P- (p/f)
MUS300P
Chorus (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Singing builds community, commitment, self-discipline, personal ownership, and responsibility to the group. Open to anyone, and focused on singing, this course will introduce and develop skills in interpreting musical notation and understanding of melody, harmony, rhythm, and aesthetics. Students will develop proper singing technique and healthy habits relating to body alignment, breath management, vowel formation, proper resonation, clear diction, and accurate intonation. Classroom activities include sight-singing, light calisthenics, breathing exercises, meditation, historical research, music games, and improvisation. The ensemble will study and perform a wide range of musical styles and genres,including regularly dividing into separate Soprano/Alto and Tenor/Bass groups. Evaluations will be based on performance and growth across each term.
MUS303
Advanced Vocal Ensemble
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Music 300/300P or instructor permission
Open by audition to advanced singers, this course builds on previously demonstrated skillin interpreting musical notation and understanding of melody, harmony, rhythm, and aesthetics. Students will develop proper singing technique and healthy habits relating to body alignment, breath management, vowel formation, proper resonation, clear diction, and accurateintonation. Classroom activities include sight-singing, light calisthenics, breathing exercises, meditation, historical research, music games, and improvisation. The ensemble willstudy and perform a wide range of musical styles and genres, including serving as an SATB a cappella ensemble. Evaluations will be based on performances in and out of the classroom setting. May be taken as 6th course: MUS303P – (p/f)
MUS303P
Advanced Vocal Ensemble (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Music 300/300P or instructor permission
Open by audition to advanced singers, this course builds on previously demonstrated skillin interpreting musical notation and understanding of melody, harmony, rhythm, and aesthetics. Students will develop proper singing technique and healthy habits relating to body alignment, breath management, vowel formation, proper resonation, clear diction, and accurateintonation. Classroom activities include sight-singing, light calisthenics, breathing exercises, meditation, historical research, music games, and improvisation. The ensemble willstudy and perform a wide range of musical styles and genres, including serving as an SATB a cappella ensemble. Evaluations will be based on performances in and out of the classroom setting.
MUS310
Bands: Wind/Rock/Jazz
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course provides an opportunity for experienced woodwind, brass, and percussion players to collaborate in a variety of ensemble settings including concert band, woodwind chamber groups, brass ensembles, saxophone ensembles, percussion groups, and jazz/rock bands.Ensemble assignments are made by the course instructor, and additional ensemble coaches are drawn from the applied teaching staff. Students work on improving their blend, technique, intonation, musicianship, ensemble playing, and improvisational skills. May be taken as 6th course: MUS310P-(p/f).
MUS310P
Bands: Wind/Rock/Jazz (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course provides an opportunity for experienced woodwind, brass, and percussion players to collaborate in a variety of ensemble settings including concert band, woodwind chamber groups, brass ensembles, saxophone ensembles, percussion groups, and jazz/rock bands.Ensemble assignments are made by the course instructor, and additional ensemble coaches are drawn from the applied teaching staff. Students work on improving their blend, technique, intonation, musicianship, ensemble playing, and improvisational skills.
MUS320
Academy Strings
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Academy Strings is open to all students, regardless of instrumental string experience. This course aims to provide students with an overview of pedagogical methods for playing in astring ensemble. Students will explore performance practice for various musical styles and will develop skills in interpreting musical notation, understanding harmony, melody, rhythm, sight-reading, bowing, fingering, tone production, and aesthetics. Classroom activities will include sight-reading, sectional rehearsals, bowing technique, historical research and performance evaluations. Evaluations will be based on performance and growth across each term. May be taken as 6th course: MUS320P – (p/f).
MUS320P
Academy Strings (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Academy Strings is open to all students, regardless of instrumental string experience. This course aims to provide students with an overview of pedagogical methods for playing in astring ensemble. Students will explore performance practice for various musical styles and will develop skills in interpreting musical notation, understanding harmony, melody, rhythm, sight-reading, bowing, fingering, tone production, and aesthetics. Classroom activities will include sight-reading, sectional rehearsals, bowing technique, historical research and performance evaluations. Evaluations will be based on performance and growth across each term.
MUS323
Chamber Music
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course provides opportunities for instrumental musicians to collaborate, rehearse, and perform in a variety of ensemble settings. Ensemble assignments are made by the course instructor, and additional ensemble coaches are drawn from the applied teaching staff. Students regularly coach each other in a uniquely collaborative seminar format, exploring questions of performance practice, technique, history, theory, and performance psychology while studying great works of chamber music literature. This course is open by audition to string players (violin, viola, violoncello, and contrabass), pianists, and wind players who demonstrate sufficient proficiency to play repertoire for chamber ensemble. May be taken as 6th course: MUS320P – (p/f).
MUS323P
Chamber Music (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course provides opportunities for instrumental musicians to collaborate, rehearse, and perform in a variety of ensemble settings. Ensemble assignments are made by the course instructor, and additional ensemble coaches are drawn from the applied teaching staff. Students regularly coach each other in a uniquely collaborative seminar format, exploring questions of performance practice, technique, history, theory, and performance psychology while studying great works of chamber music literature. This course is open by audition to string players (violin, viola, violoncello, and contrabass), pianists, and wind players who demonstrate sufficient proficiency to play repertoire for chamber ensemble.
MUS500
AP Music Theory
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Music is a language: this course examines and develops skill in using that language. Following a brief introduction to the rudiments of notation (clefs, pitch, and rhythm), most of the year is spent exploring structure and organization in music (tonality, meter, form, and the four elements), and mastering idioms that convey meaning. Class and homework time is divided between written work, ear training, and composition. Written work includes counterpoint and figured bass realization. Aural skills are developed through regular melodicand 4-part harmonic dictation, and through sight-singing. Composition offers opportunities for students to apply their theoretical knowledge, to practice creating and developing musical ideas, and to experiment with expressing themselves in this abstract language. Students who do well in this course will be prepared to take the Music Theory AP examination in May.
THE200
Acting I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course explores the basic principles of acting including ensemble building, improvisation, voice, movement, textual analysis and theater vocabulary. Class assignments include writing and performing monologues and presenting scenes and projects. Students also explore various texts from classical to contemporary. NO PREVIOUS ACTING EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. May be taken as 6th course: THE200P-(p/f).
THE200P
Acting I (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course explores the basic principles of acting including ensemble building, improvisation, voice, movement, textual analysis and theater vocabulary. Class assignments include writing and performing monologues and presenting scenes and projects. Students also explore various texts from classical to contemporary. NO PREVIOUS ACTING EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY.
THE300
Acting II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course follows Acting I (although preferable, it is not necessary to take Acting I prior to this class) and is an in-depth study of the actor’s craft. Students explore more challenging texts and continue to develop their ability to analyze and perform more complex characters. Ensemble work continues to be the foundation of this class and students will continue to strengthen their voice, movement and interpretive skills. Students will also havethe opportunity to study plays and theater practitioners from around the world. NO PREVIOUS ACTING EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. May be taken as 6th course: THE300P-(p/f).
THE300P
Acting II (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course follows Acting I (although preferable, it is not necessary to take Acting I prior to this class) and is an in-depth study of the actor’s craft. Students explore more challenging texts and continue to develop their ability to analyze and perform more complex characters. Ensemble work continues to be the foundation of this class and students will continue to strengthen their voice, movement and interpretive skills. Students will also havethe opportunity to study plays and theater practitioners from around the world. NO PREVIOUS ACTING EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY.
THE302
Playwriting
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
In this course, students will read exemplary plays from different eras and styles. Each student will also write a one-act play of their own. Students will study the work of Caryl Churchill, Marsha Norman, Paula Vogel, Eugene O’Neil, and Charles Mee- and the works-in-progress of their classmates! No prior playwriting or theatre experience is necessary. May be taken as 6th course: THE500P
THE402
Take to the Stage!
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mrs. Hynds & Ms. Robinson
P7
Is acting on your DA bucket list? Have you performed on stage yet? Here’s your chance! Inthis class, both actors and directors will collaborate to develop a small performance for an invited audience at the end of term. Students will contribute to the development of a creative ensemble and examine elements of performance. No experience is necessary.
THE407
Film Studies
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mrs. Hynds
P4 P5
This course analyzes and critiques classic and contemporary cinema from around the world.We shall examine basic elements of film production, comparative filmmaking styles and variousgenres such as Film Noir, Surrealism and Italian Neo-realism. Additionally, we study prominent international filmmakers. There is a weekly screening.
THE409
Theater for Social Justice
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Ms. Robinson
P6
“Theater has an incredible capacity to move people to social change, to address issues, to inspire social revolution.” –Eve Ensler. If you’re passionate about making a difference inthis world, and would like to learn how to use theater as a tool for change, come join us! Asan ensemble we will read, write, and perform pieces of theater about social issues and identities. No previous theater or social justice activism experience is necessary, only a willingness to learn!
THE500
Act/Directing for Production
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Acting I or Acting II
After completing Acting I and II, committed and experienced acting students are encouraged to progress to a more advanced study of acting. Students are encouraged to contribute to the development of a creative ensemble as well as develop their self-sufficiency as actors. In addition to learning advanced acting techniques, a major performance project is presented at the end of the term. May be taken as 6th course: THE500P-(p/f).
THE500P
Act/Directing for Prod (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Acting I or Acting II
After completing Acting I and II, committed and experienced acting students are encouraged to progress to a more advanced study of acting. Students are encouraged to contribute to the development of a creative ensemble as well as develop their self-sufficiency as actors. In addition to learning advanced acting techniques, a major performance project is presented at the end of the term.
HEA200
Health Issues
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course examines topics related to human sexuality, alcohol and other drugs, stress management and general adolescent development. Through classroom presentations and discussions, students will study a variety of issues, which are especially pertinent to theirown personal awareness and development.
HIS201
Ancient Civilizations
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course examines the development of Near-Eastern, Mediterranean, and European societies from antiquity to the High Middle Ages. Course materials include a wide array of historical and literary texts that provide insight into key events, themes and ideas. Topics include the civilizations of classical Greece and imperial Rome, the culture of late antiquity, the nature of medieval civilization in Europe, and the development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Each 200-level history course provides students with a foundation ofcore skills, including source analysis, discussion and debate, inquiry-based research and analytical writing and presentation.
HIS210
Africa and Latin America
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course uses literature, along with a rich variety of historical sources including documents and films, to study the cultural and political consequences of colonialism in selected countries in Africa and Latin America. The course explores how the forces of conquest, colonization and commerce have shaped the lives of individuals and communities in these countries. We also focus on the process of upheaval and change associated with decolonization, independence and revolution in these regions. Along with being interdisciplinary, texts rely heavily upon indigenous voices and focus on a range of countries including Nigeria, the Congo, South Africa, Mexico, El Salvador, Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Each 200-level history course provides students with a foundation of coreskills, including source analysis, discussion and debate, inquiry-based research, and analytical writing and presentation.
HIS220
Asia in World History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course serves both as an introduction for students who have never studied Asian history and as a means, for those with foundational background, to further explore the societies, politics and belief systems of India, China and the Middle East. While students focus primarily on one of the three regional civilizations each term, they also trace the complex web of commercial and cultural exchange paths that crossed Asia and stretched to Europe, Africa, and Oceania. Along the way, they inquire into the relationship between these early pathways and modern global ones. Secondary source texts provide scaffolding for the course, but we also read from primary spiritual texts like the Bhagavad Gita, the Confucian Analects and the Qur’an, as well as from early travelogues, histories and manuals on ruling and warfare. Each 200-level history course provides students with a foundation of core skills, including source analysis, discussion and debate, inquiry-based research, and analytical writing and presentation.
HIS230
Big History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
How did the universe begin? How has the universe developed over time? How do humans fit into this evolving story? Where is the future heading? These are questions that origin stories from different cultures have addressed for thousands of years. This course explores the modern scientific origin story of how the universe and life within it has grown more complex over the last 13.8 billion years. This tale, itself thousands of years in the making,has been woven together by a wide spectrum of thinkers and scholars from numerous scientific and historical fields. Together, students will engage powerful ideas and common themes acrossthe entire time scale of history, from the Big Bang and creation of star systems to the emergence of the Earth’s first microorganisms and the recent rise of human societies. BecauseBig History relies upon content, concepts and texts drawn from many disciplines, students will need to carefully weigh how scholars develop and justify their claims about the past, and how, over time, new claims serve to refute or refine earlier ones. Students will also have the opportunity to create their own narratives, explanations and arguments in response to Big History’s essential questions. Each 200-level history course provides students with a foundation of core skills, including source analysis, discussion and debate, inquiry-based research, and analytical writing and presentation.
HIS400
United States History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course surveys the history of the United States from colonial times to the present. Major themes and developments in social, economic, cultural and international history are integrated within a framework of a political narrative. We examine the establishment and endurance of the American nation as well as the tensions and divisions that have marked its history. The course stresses careful reading, critical thinking, primary-source analysis, discussion skills and analytical writing, and activities that may include debates, roundtables and simulations.
HIS404
The City as a Work of Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mrs. Sherburne & Mr. Payne
P5
Combining elements of history with art and design, students will examine the characteristic elements of historical urban form, to explain their presence and meaning, and to examine the ways in which they were modified over time and space. The physical form of theurban environment in diverse locations (both built and unbuilt) will be studied from social, economic, political, and design perspectives. May also be taken as ART404.
HIS500
AP Seminar: Global H2O
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Sophomores may be eligible with permission of the instructor
Clean water is essential for the living world and the global economy, but in many areas the supply of uncontaminated water is in danger of disappearing. In this AP Seminar course students explore the environmental, social and economic issues associated with the worldwide struggle to acquire clean water. As part of the AP Capstone Program of the College Board, theAP Seminar course challenges students to guide their own inquiry process as they learn to askgood research questions, understand and analyze arguments, evaluate multiple perspectives, synthesize ideas, collaborate effectively, communicate persuasively using written and oral expression, and reflect on their learning and skill development. AP Seminar: Global H2O Resources is an interdisciplinary course designed to foster inquiry, global awareness, scholarship and creativity. Students examine the a viability and use of clean water at local,national, and global levels by means of investigative case studies, debates, independent and collaborative projects, chemistry lab work, and field trips to local sites. Students who takeAP Seminar are eligible to pursue a capstone project during senior year in the AP Research course. May also be taken as Science: SCI500.
HIS501
AP Seminar:Global Food Systems
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Sophomores may be eligible with permission of the instructor
In this AP Seminar course students explore the complexity of global food systems while developing their skills as critical thinkers and global citizens. The course focuses on localand global issues related to agriculture and food production, nutrition and culture, and hunger and food insecurity. As part of the AP Capstone Program, the AP Seminar course challenges students to guide their own inquiry process as they learn to ask good research questions, understand and analyze arguments, evaluate multiple perspectives, synthesize ideas, collaborate effectively, communicate persuasively using written and oral expression, and reflect on their learning and skill development. Throughout this interdisciplinary course, students will deepen their understanding of food systems through debates, seminar discussions, independent research, collaborative projects, oral presentations, guest speakers, scientific inquiry, and field trips to local farms and food producers. Students will take advantage of Pioneer Valley’s rich agricultural heritage, Deerfield Academy’s award winning dining hall, and other contacts in the valley and around the world as they seek out and analyze divergent perspectives about food systems and their environmental, economic, cultural, and health impacts. Students will be challenged to move from ideas to action as they analyze systems, identify problems and propose solutions related to food around the globe andon their plates. Most of the second half of the year will be spent working on a team project and individual research-based essay as part of the College Board Assessments for AP Seminar. May be taken as Science: SCI501.
HIS503
American Studies
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This is an interdisciplinary course combining honors-level U.S. history and American literature. The course fulfills both the junior English and history requirements, and prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in American history. Students examine the social, economic, political, and cultural heritage of the United States through a combinationof primary documents, interpretive secondary sources, and representative works of American literature and art. Close, critical analysis, responsible oral discourse and expository writing are emphasized. American Studies meets for a double period, is taken concurrently with ENG503 and is team-taught. Students in this course should consult with their teacher about taking the AP exam. SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT
HIS513
Honors United States History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course, for students who have demonstrated initiative in prior humanities classes, is a fast-paced survey of United States history from colonial times to the early 21st century. Using a college-level textbook that is supplemented daily with excerpts of primary sources,as well as occasional secondary source readings and videos, students examine major themes anddevelopments in social, economic, cultural, and international history within a framework of apolitical narrative. With an emphasis on careful reading, critical thinking, primary-source analysis and analytical writing, students engage with one another and with the text to develop both a command of the material, and the skills of an historian. Those skills are inculcated through extended research-based projects as well as regular writing assignments. Students are expected to take the AP US History exam in May. SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT
HIS523
Honors European History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
200-level history course at Deerfield or the equivalent
This course examines major topics and selected themes in the history of Europe, from the Renaissance to the recent past. Major topics include the Renaissance, the Reformation, politics, society and culture in early-modern Europe, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the era of the French Revolution and Napoleon, the emergence of modern political ideologies, nation-building and imperialism in the nineteenth century, the world wars and the advent of the Cold War. Special attention will be given to interactions between Europe and other regions of the world and to the influence of non-European regions on the development of European civilization. Students in this course are expected to take the AP examination in May. SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT
HIS601
Moot Court: US Constitution
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Lyons
P1
In this class, students assume the role of lawyer and justices to examine, argue, and rule upon significant cases before the United States Supreme Court. From the extent of our privacy to the limits on the powers of the federal government, the Supreme Court is the arbiter of many critical issues in American society as it seeks to balance the often conflicting rights of individuals with the broader interests of society. Topics for debate include privacy issues (including gay marriage), equality under the law (including affirmative action), and freedom of speech. Assessments primarily consist of moot courts on recent or current notable cases before the Court.
HIS602
Global Soccer
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Rajballie
P3
In this course we examine the world’s most popular sport and its most widespread culturalpractice – soccer (football). We investigate the game’s history and its power as a cultural force in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Readings and case studies highlight intersections with politics, violence, war, nationalism, identity, class, race, gender, globalization, finance, marketing, literature, film, and art. The course combines general analysis with national and regional case studies that invite connections across boundaries oftime and space; and, at a more general level, it invites students to think critically about the social, cultural, and political significance of sport and entertainment in the twenty-first century. The course stresses close reading, critical thinking, and discussion.
HIS604
Freedom Summer to Ferguson
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Heise
P5 & P6
Fifty years ago, Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Voting Rights Act which, combined with the Civil Rights Act of the previous year, signaled the end of the Jim Crow era in American history. Or so we thought. Despite the election of our first African American president, full racial equality has proved elusive in our politics, economic life, schools, and our criminal justice system. And frustration and anger are growing, as the recent outcries in New York City, Ferguson, Missouri and Baltimore, Maryland suggest. Drawing upon avariety of print and film sources, this course surveys the American quest to fulfill its promise of freedom and equality over the past fifty years, noting both its achievements and its shortcomings.
HIS605
History of Opium
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mrs. Friends
P4
Fentanyl, heroin, OxyContin, naloxone. These drug names punctuate media stories about theopioid crisis that has swept New England and other key areas of the United States. Why, among“developed” countries, does the US stand out for this problem? How did we get to a point at which nearly 1,800 Massachusetts residents die annually from opioid-related overdoses? Our course begins just up the road in Greenfield. We then trace opioids to their sources, mappingthe global web of narcotics-trafficking routes and identifying stakeholders who both benefit from and are crippled by one of the world’s most lucrative renewable commodities. To understand opium’s power and influence, we examine its history, exploring man’s economic, political and even artistic addictions to opium through studies that range from Opium Wars tomusic and literature to surprisingly varied long-term effects of opiates on both soldiers andcivilians. Assessments include debates, interviews with substance-abuse specialists, and a research project.
HIS607
Modern Europe, 1890-1945
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course surveys the history of Europe from the confidence and splendor of the late nineteenth century to the material and moral ruin of the mid twentieth century. We examine modern Europe’s glories as well as its divisions and failure to solve internal problems that twice brought it to the brink of self-destruction. Social, economic and cultural history are integrated within a framework of political narrative. Special attention is given to the modernism of the Belle Epoque, the Great War, peacemaking and stabilization in the 1920s, challenges to the postwar order (including fascism and communism), the Spanish Civil War, theSecond World War, and the Holocaust. Film, literature and memoir are used extensively to understand, interpret and evaluate the human experience of the era. [This course is offered every other year, and alternates with Postwar Europe: History, Film and Literature since 1945.]
HIS608
From Auschwitz to Ramallah
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
During the fall term we will study the Holocaust, the Nazis’ purposeful and highly systematic attempt to destroy the entire Jewish population of Europe. Examining the Holocaustis a journey into the heart of darkness, a tour of the most heinous actions in recorded history. It is as well a testimony to the indomitable human spirit, to courage, compassion and empathy. The Holocaust also served as a key impetus for the creation of Israel in 1948. This tiny strip of land has been the setting for one of the most intractable conflicts of thepast 75 years. It is a place that two cultures fiercely call their homeland and that sits at the epicenter of turmoil in the Middle East. In the winter and spring terms we will explore how Israeli and Palestinian cultures have created and sustained narratives of their history and identity that lock them in conflict. We will read Palestinian and Israeli writings, watchfilms from each culture, dig deeply into historical material, study both Judaism and Islam, and follow current events. During spring break, we will travel to Israel/Palestine to deepen our work on site. We will seek to understand this conflict that has resulted in four wars, anoccupation and two uprisings, the resurgence of Anti-Semitism, conceptions about terrorism and bitter debates in governments, organizations, and campuses around the world. May also be taken as REL608. SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT. THIS CLASS INLCUDES REQUIRED SPRING BREAK TRIP TO ISRAEL/PALESTINE.
HIS610
Modern Times:20th C. World His
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Dynamic, violent, and unpredictable, the past one hundred years have been tumultuous—a time of wonder and tragedy, of great breakthroughs and disastrous breakdowns. This course examines important ideas of the past one hundred years, but concentrates mainly upon the major developments, discoveries, trends, and tensions of the post-1945 period. The course mayaddress total war and its impact on thought and culture, Nazism and Stalinism, the Cold War and the collapse of communism, decolonization and nationalism in developing countries, genocide and human rights, technological change, emerging environmental challenges, the impact of the September 11 attacks, and the financial crash of 2008.
HIS611
Understanding the Holocaust
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Baker
P7
The Holocaust was the purposeful and highly systematic attempt to annihilate human beingson a scale never seen before or since; more particularly, the Nazis sought to destroy the entire Jewish population on the European continent. In examining the Holocaust this course raises some essential questions about society and humanity. It is a journey into the heart ofdarkness, a tour of the most heinous set of actions in recorded human history. It is also a testimony to the indomitable human spirit, to the will to live, to courage, compassion and empathy. Whether discussing experiments on obedience to authority, watching documentaries on the horrors of the extermination camps, reading accounts by perpetrators, victims, survivors,bystanders and rescuers, this course will present you with some of the most unsettling issuesyou will confront in your education. May also be taken as PHI611.
HIS615
India, China, U.S.
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The world is changing at an astonishing pace, and India and China, the world’s two most populous nations, contribute significantly to that change. What is more, the relationships those countries have had with the United States and with each other influence both foreign and domestic policy more than most people might realize. This course draws upon the politicalsocial, economic, environmental and demographic histories of India and China from WWII to thepresent, both to understand the impact of modernization on the two nations and to study U.S-China-India relations. Why, this past December, did President-elect Trump’s phone call with the president of Taiwan ignite a firestorm of media criticism and provoke a formal complaint from China’s foreign ministry? Was it a good idea to “dump” the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership) trade deal? How is it that India’s head of state, a man formerly banned from entering the U.S. on religious-freedom grounds, was invited last summer to address a joint session of Congress? Is India really that important as a “democratic counterweight” to China in Asia? Course topics, in addition to foreign and trade policy, include pollution, urbanization, corruption, censorship, the debate over “Asian human rights” and comparative popular culture.
HIS640
Economics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission
In the first half of the year students are introduced to microeconomic theory through thestudy of such concepts as supply and demand, the law of diminishing returns, marginal utilityand the theory of the firm and industry. The second half of the year focuses on macroeconomicanalysis and its historic development from Keynes to Friedman. Such concepts as national income analysis and monetary and fiscal policy are covered in depth. We also focus on public policy and current political/economic issues through the use of case studies and supplementalreadings. This course prepares students to take the AP Micro and Macro Exam in May.SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT
HIS694
AP Research: Global Enviro
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Seminar: Global H20 or AP Seminar: Global Food Systems
This course explores the changing relationship between human societies and global ecologies over time. It uses as its central question: How has the world environment shaped human history and how have humans altered the environment? To help make sense of a topic of this magnitude, the first half of the course examines three important transformative periods – the Early Modern World (1500-1800), Industrialization and Energy Transitions (1800-1950) and the Great Acceleration (1950-Present). A variety of themes, such as water and air pollution, waste regimes, and population growth, require students to trace the evolution of environmental forces over the last five hundred years. Specific case studies may include the transformation of the Rhine River into the world’s greatest commercial stream, the implications of global trash trading, and the debate over large dam construction in the American West. As the second course in the AP Capstone experience, students will further the skills they acquired in the AP Seminar course by learning historical research methodology, employing ethical research practices, and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing historical data. The second half of the course is devoted to extensive independent research as students build on previously-developed research skills to create, manage, and conduct an in-depth investigation of a historical topic of their choosing. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4,000-5,000 words and an oral defense presentation.
HIS695
Research: Gender & Politics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
As Billie Jean King put it, “the more you know about history, the more you know about yourself.” From the tennis court to the campaign trail, our understanding of gender roles informs our understanding of ourselves and our world. This class will examine how gender roles have shaped debates around political access, rights, and leadership, as well as how andwhy those roles and opportunities have changed over time. Topics will include 20th-century suffrage movements from around the world; the debate around the Equal Rights Amendment centering on definitions of equality in work and military service; and political campaigns and leadership. Such case studies aim to develop not only historical sensibilities in students, but also the skills of research and writing to prepare students for the second halfof the course, during which students select a topic of inquiry, formulate and revise a question, conduct extended independent research, and write a research paper.
ARA100
Introduction to Arabic
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is an introduction to the Arabic language and culture. Students work with a variety of media to master reading and writing the Arabic alphabet and develop listening and speaking skills in both the Modern Standard Arabic that is understood by more than 300 million Arabs around the world, and the Levantine dialect used in Jordan, Palestine, Syria, and Lebanon. With an emphasis on developing communicative skills and an understanding of grammar, Students learn the basic linguistic structures of the Semitic Language family and develop an appreciation of Arabic calligraphy art. Through a blended instructional format, students use iPads to complete online homework through apps, interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true pen and paper. Much of the content is introduced through homework and then practiced and activated in class through collaborative activities and speaking experiences. Class is conducted mostly in Arabic with some English when needed.
ARA200
Intermediate Arabic
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic 100 or the equivalent
This course advances students’ Arabic skills into the intermediate level of proficiency in all language skills, both in the communicative Levantine dialect as well as in the Modern Standard Arabic. This class continues the blended instructional format, students continue to build their communicative skills and expand their knowledge of grammar. In class, students are exposed to authentic material and are engaged in collaborative work that fosters a deeperunderstanding of the values and practices of the Arabic culture. Students in this class continue the use of iPads to submit a variety of homework assignments through apps, interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true pen and paper. This class is conducted mostly in Arabic.
ARA300
Intermediate High Arabic
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic 200 or the equivalent
This course builds upon students’ language skills developed in Arabic 200 or its equivalent, to advance into the Intermediate-High level of communication skills in the language. Students at this level continue to expand their knowledge of grammar as they apply their skills through collaborative real-world assignments. This continues to help students advance their language skills in the Modern Standard Arabic and the Levantine dialect. Students continue to learn through a variety of homework assignments, apps, interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true pen and paper. This class is conducted in Arabic.
ARA400
Advanced Arabic
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic 300 or the equivalent
At this level, students continue developing their language skills through authentic material in the Levantine dialect alongside literature in Modern Standard Arabic. Grammar is integrated through classroom discussions and activities. In this class, students expand theirunderstanding of grammar and enrich their vocabulary as they engage with the material throughhomework assignments apps, interactive websites, and videos. This class is conducted in Arabic.
ARA500
Advanced Arabic Plus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic IV or the equivalent
This class focuses on the individual student’s stated goals and objectives as it continues to develop language skills through authentic texts and literature in Modern Standard Arabic alongside a variety of textbook activities online. Grammar is integrated through classroom discussions and activities. In Advanced Plus, students continue to expand vocabulary and develop advanced communication skills in the dialects of choice. Learning mediums include apps, interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and truepen and paper. This class is conducted in Arabic.
CHI100
Chinese I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course is an introduction to Mandarin Chinese for students with little or no background in the language. Students learn the basic communication skills in Mandarin and explore related cultural aspects. The course begins with an introduction to the sound system and moves on to basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students develop their language skills and culture awareness through daily collaborative activities and practice using text, audio and video materials as well. By the end of the year, students are expected to have good pronunciation, oral and aural proficiency for basic communication, and foundational grammar for simple sentences and short paragraph building.
CHI200
Chinese II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chinese 200 or the equivalent
This course is a continuation of Chinese I skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. In addition, the course includes an in-depth study of grammar. Students strive for accuracy while focusing on the ability to communicate in varied contexts and with proper grammar. Class work is supplemented by various technology tools and online resources. Class is conducted in Chinese.
CHI300
Chinese III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chinese 200 or the equivalent
In this intermediate level course, students reinforce what they have acquired in the previous levels and expand and deepen their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing by studying a variety of materials. Students focus on speaking and writing in a coherent, linguistically appropriate manner, using well-formed paragraphs through daily practice, storytelling and projects. Cultural content is integrated into each topic of discussion. Finishing the course, students are to be able to carry out rather fluent conversations about daily life and personal experiences and have acquired solid reading and writing skills to get ready for the next level.
CHI400
Chinese IV
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chinese III or the equivalent
This course aims to develop competency in advanced Chinese with an emphasis on fluency ofspoken language, reading, and writing. A variety of authentic materials is used to give students a deeper knowledge of Chinese language, culture, history, and social issues. However, a systematic study of Chinese vocabulary and grammar will continue to be emphasized and practiced through the use of the textbook. Students in this class are introduced to the format and material of the Chinese AP Language Examination. Class is conducted in Chinese.
CHI500
Chinese V
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chinese IV or the equivalent
This course is for students who wish to pursue the study of Chinese at a more advanced level. Students will further develop overall language proficiency through studying a variety of authentic materials and audiovisual sources that cover topics including culture, values, education, art, fashion, social issues, as well as controversial issues in contemporary Chinese society. They will expand their vocabulary and enhance their grammar to handle these broad subjects in both reading and writing. They will also build fluency with confidence and competency in Chinese by engaging in discussion, collaborative work, and projects about various topics. Furthermore, students will develop a more enriched understanding of the traditions and changes in Chinese culture and society.
CHI699
Chinese Tutorial
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission
This advanced course is a modern Chinese literature and writing class for students who love to read and write. Students explore a variety of readings and practice a wide range of writing styles in order to analyze and develop effective skills for literary analysis and appreciation. Narrative fiction, films, poetry, and critical essays are included. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion. In addition, culture and history will be an integral part of this course. Class is conducted in Chinese.
CLA600
Healing Achilles
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
No knowledge of Latin, Greek, or Ancient History is required to enroll in this class. Howdoes war change the warrior? What responsibility do citizens have to help warriors reintegrate into society?What¹s at stake if society does not make good on this responsibility? Since 2001 the U.S. Army alone has seen more than 1.5 million troop years of deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan by close to 500,000 service members. In the same time period America has seen and documented the struggles these service members face upon returning home. The ancient Greeks warred constantly and grappled with many of the same issues we are facing today. Through literature they engaged their citizenry with relevant topics and helped heal both warriors and the society in which they lived. In this class we will read ancient Greek literature in translation as well as explore modern writing that explains how 2,500 year old texts can help modern society fulfill its responsibility to the warriors we trust to defend our way of life. We will explore the nature and root causes of Post Traumatic Stress and engage with the local veteran community as we try to find ways to connect our work in this class with our capacity to serve the greater good.
FRE100
French I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
In this introductory course, students learn basic French communication skills – while also exploring the cultures of France and Quebec. They engage in their own learning through collaboration, investigation and practice using text, video and audio materials. Students areexposed to, and expected to master, the present tense, a future tense, the command forms and two past tenses that they will use in their writing and speaking. An emphasis on speaking, listening, reading and basic writing guides the course. Students leave the introductory levelexcited and interested in further French language acquisition.
FRE200
French II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French I or the equivalent
This second level course focuses on increasing communicating skills, both in written and oral form, through the lens of grammatical acquisition. Students are exposed to, and expectedto master, the past tenses, the future tenses, and the conditional that they will use in their writing and speaking. The study of negatives, and several pronoun categories will be integrated along the way. Reading a variety of Francophone texts, along with video skit performances, daily oral participation, and individual and group projects will establish the natural use of the acquired grammar.
FRE203
French II Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French I, instructor permission, & curr teacher approval
This accelerated intermediate level course is for students with a high degree of aural-oral proficiency. In addition to an in-depth study of grammar, students develop conversation skills and read a variety of short literary works from France and the Francophone world. Various technology sites will be used to enhance both written and oral production. As with all honors classes at Deerfield, French II Honors requires a substantial and consistent work ethic in order to master the material in a satisfactory manner.
FRE300
French III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French II or the equivalent
The third year of language study is pivotal. Using the skills gained in the first two levels as a springboard, the students expand and deepen their knowledge and comfort level with language use. Intensive grammar review of the items covered in the previous levels allows students to move to the study of the conditional past, if clause structures, and an introduction to the subjunctive. Naturally the student’s language production becomes more sophisticated. The reading of their first substantial novel opens them up to the diverse francophone diaspora. An end of year project puts to use all of the skills acquired in the first three levels of language study.
FRE303
French III Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French II, instructor permission, & curr teacher approval
The honors track for level III continues exposure to advanced grammatical structures, which includes all tenses within the indicative and subjunctive moods, and a more sophisticated application of pronouns. The study of 19th century French history and literature are the center of the class – Balzac, Rimbaud, Hugo, Daudet, and Pagnol. Through the study of these texts, students understand grammar and structure in context. Papers, skits, daily analysis, and class debates engage the students with the material. Although the SAT preparation book is used for practice tests, students are not required to take the test at the end of the year. As with all honors classes at Deerfield, French III Honors requires a substantial and consistent work ethic in order to master the material in a satisfactory manner.
FRE400
French IV
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French III or the equivalent
This course is for students who would like to pursue the study of French at a more advanced level. Students examine grammar more deeply through literature, continue to develop oral proficiency through discussion, and further hone their reading comprehension through thestudy of certain historical periods and their accompanying texts. A textbook is also used when grammar and structure review is necessary. Papers, skits, daily analysis, and debates help students engage with the material. Although the SAT preparation book is used for practice tests, students are not required to take the test at the end of the year.
FRE503
French IV Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French III, instructor permission, & curr teacher approval
This accelerated course emphasizes oral proficiency, composition, and literary and oral analysis. Students will read a variety of genres from the Francophone world. This class will also examine French history through various films. Students are introduced to the structure of the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture Examination. As with all honors classesat Deerfield, French IV Honors requires a substantial and consistent work ethic in order to master the material in a satisfactory manner.
FRE510
French V
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French IV or the equivalent
This is a literature seminar that continues to emphasize grammar and composition in orderto polish students’ writing skills. Students read works by a variety of authors from France and the Francophone world. Papers, oral presentations, debates and discussions are also used to continue developing oral competency.
FRE603
French V Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French IVH, instructor permission, & curr teacher approval
This accelerated course emphasizes oral proficiency, composition, and literary and oral analysis. Students will read a variety of genres from the Francophone world. This class will also examine French history through various films. Strong students in this course can choose to take the AP exam. As with all honors classes at Deerfield, French V Honors requires a substantial and consistent work ethic in order to master the material in a satisfactory manner.
FRE703
French VI Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French VH, instructor permission, & curr teacher approval
This is a topics-based course for advanced speakers of French who have finished French V Honors. The course is especially designed for those students who wish to continue their French studies at the college level. Readings explore a wide variety of topics such as issuesof contemporary France and the European Union. Open to students with permission of the instructor. This course may not be offered every year. Strong students can choose to take theAP exam. As with all honors classes at Deerfield, French VI Honors requires a substantial andconsistent work ethic in order to master the material in a satisfactory manner.
LAT100
Foundations in Latin 1
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Who were the Romans? What did they say about the world and how did they say it? What makes their language and culture relevant today? This course helps students start developing the tools they need to read Latin and engage with the literature and culture of the ancient Romans. We will explore strong connections between English and Latin as we focus on how wordswork together to make meaning. Studying Latin emphasizes self-discipline and nurtures creative problem solving in the context of language. Group work and project-based learning help us develop critical skills relating to cooperation and collaboration. We routinely explore how each one of us can be critical of our own learning as we manage the process that begins with comprehension and ends with mastery. Cultural content focuses on the geography ofthe Italian Peninsula and early influences on Roman culture.
LAT200
Foundations in Latin II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Latin 100 or equivalent
In this course we finish constructing a solid foundation in Latin so that we can start reading authentic texts and learn from the Romans themselves. Building on the structures of the Latin language we learned in the first year course, we will study the variety of components that make up complex sentences. We will focus on the logical process of translating to help us unlock the meaning in the Latin we read. Exploring the history of the Roman Republic will help us establish a cultural context for the texts we will read in this course and in the upper levels of Latin at Deerfield.
LAT300
Latin III: Intro to Latin Lit.
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Latin 200 or equivalent
In conjunction with a systematic review of fundamentals, students engage in selected readings of both prose and poetry during the year. Texts, for which students may be asked to identify parallels to modern examples of ancient literary and documentary genres comprise thefall term. Students progress to Cicero’s ‘Somnium Scipionis’ in the winter and an explorationof what it means to be an effective citizen of a diverse and sprawling community that is in need of wise, informed guidance. Selections from authors that may include Ovid, Catullus, Vergil, and Caesar constitute the spring syllabus, in which students, confronted with love, conflict, purpose, and destiny in their own lives, meet these themes writ large in Roman history and culture between the end of the 2nd Punic War and the death of Augustus.
LAT500
Latin IV: Leadership & Empire
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Latin 300 or the equivalent
This course explores the ethics of leadership and the onus of empire via readings selected for the Advanced Placement syllabus in Latin. As political upheaval and social turmoil spiraled out of control, the Roman Republic confronted the crisis of its own existence. Caesar’s Commentarii de bello Gallico and the Aeneid of Vergil are profound meditations on the questions of leadership and empire from writers who were in a position to know: one was himself a principle actor in the events he describes, a consummate politician and commander whose work is a subtle, skillful rationale of justification; the other, a sensitive and supremely gifted poet, welcomed into the privileged circle of the powerful whose epic poem became, as it were, both the signature and conscience of the Augustan regime.Thus, the course is as much about history, ethics, and morality as it is about language. Students who take the course will be prepared, if they so choose, to sit for the AP exam in Latin.
LAT600
Latin V: Roman Lit. in Context
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Latin 500 or the equivalent
This advanced course in the literature of the late Republic and early Empire asks students to apply the skills developed/acquired in previous courses as they read more deeply and produce more concrete analysis in both class discussions and in writing. This particular period was one of tremendous ferment in which literary experimentation and creative adaptation were hallmarks of the Roman cultural achievement. This achievement went hand in hand with the political turmoil that resulted in the establishment of the principate and an age of peace and stability known as the Pax Romana. Students will engage with a given genre or genres and cultivate the ability to approach ancient texts critically in light of their understanding of the historical and political context of this period. Classroom discussions go beyond the translation of texts to explore the implications of not only the them atic content but also the style of the texts we read.
LAT699
Advanced Tutorial
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission
Advanced Tutorial may be offered to students who, in consultation with the department andwith its endorsement, wish to pursue an individualized course in classical studies.
SPA100
Spanish I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
In this introductory course, students learn basic Spanish communication skills – including vocabulary and grammar – while exploring new cultures and traditions. They expand their knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world and engage in learning through collaboration, investigation and practice using text, video and audio materials. An emphasis on speaking, listening, reading and basic writing guides the course. Students complete this level excited for and interested in further Spanish language acquisition. Class is conducted primarily in Spanish. Open to all students; juniors and seniors need permission from the Academic Dean’s Office.
SPA200
Spanish II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish 100 or the equivalent
In this course, students continue their exploration of Spanish by focusing on Spanish grammar and vocabulary, applied to “real life” situations. We work to further develop the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing, while at the same time exploring the Spanish-speaking world through a wide variety of materials, including literature, film, music, periodicals, and various web-based resources. Students develop theircommand of Spanish structures and vocabulary, their ability to communicate when writing and speaking, and a deeper understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Class is conducted primarily in Spanish.
SPA300
Spanish III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish 200 or the equivalent
Spanish 3 is an intermediate level course in which students review the grammatical structures from the beginning sequence while developing their communicative abilities. The class also studies in greater depth the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, using articles, books, films, and other authentic materials as starting points for studying topics pertinent to Latin America and Spain. Conversational fluency is developed through daily pair and group activities, and oral exams and projects push students to express longer and more complex thoughts. The class also focuses on more extensive reading and writing practice, and students are frequently required to write reflections and essays in Spanish. Class is conducted in Spanish.
SPA303
Spanish III Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Departmental approval
Spanish 3 Honors is designed for students who have excelled in Spanish 2. Students reviewall of the major grammatical structures at a fast pace while developing their communicative abilities. The class also studies in depth the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, using articles, books, films, and other authentic materials as starting points for studying topics pertinent to Latin America. A full term is devoted to reading a Latin American novel. Conversational fluency is developed through daily pair and group activities, and oral exams and projects push students to express longer and more complex thoughts. The class also focuses on more extensive reading and writing practice, and students are frequently required to write reflections and essays. The students who excel in Spanish 3 Honors are recommended for Spanish 5. Class is conducted in Spanish.SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT
SPA400
Spanish IV
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish 300 or the equivalent
Which works of art reveal a moment in the history of a country? Which songs unveil the stories of its people? Which films transport us to a different place and allow us to experience another culture? Throughout the year, students are exposed to varied cultural materials and experiences that foster a deeper understanding of the values and practices of the target culture. Individual and collaborative work allows students to develop greater proficiency in the structures of the language and expand their knowledge of the diversity of voices within the Spanish-speaking world. Activities include in-class discussion, group activities, compositions and journal writing centered on the active use of language and a review of the most important aspects of Spanish grammar. Materials include extensive readings(literary and journalistic texts) and audiovisual sources (film). Class is conducted in Spanish.
SPA402
Spanish IV – Community Service
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Departmental approval
This course follows most of the curriculum from the regular Spanish IV course but adds a community service component. Students teach Spanish to third and fourth graders from Deerfield Elementary most Wednesdays during the seventy-minute period. The Spanish IV-CS course is open to those who have finished Spanish 3 or 3 honors at Deerfield and who wish to serve the community while continuing their Spanish studies. This course is a full academic year commitment. We ask that students speak with their current teacher prior to signing up for this class to express their interest in the student teaching component. Students will acquire the tools and experience to prepare fun, exciting and productive elementary Spanish classes. Class is conducted in Spanish. SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT
SPA500
Spanish V
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish 400 or the equivalent
In this advanced course, students continue to develop oral and written proficiency in Spanish through the study of literature, culture and politics of contemporary Spain, with a special focus on the time period following the Civil War in 1939. An exploration and analysisof authentic cultural materials such as literary texts, films, periodicals and web-based resources provide students with the opportunity to develop a more sophisticated understandingof Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Themes of the course include exile and political persecution, resistance to totalitarianism, gender and politics, the evolution of art and literature, and issues in contemporary Spain. Students are introduced to the format and material of the Spanish AP Language Examination, but they are not required to take it. Class is conducted in Spanish.
SPA603
Honors Latin Amer. Literature
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission
This course is divided into three distinct terms. In the fall we explore Latin American literature from its beginnings starting with pre-Columbian texts such as the Popol Vuh. Odd and even years will read different texts yet they will all come from the Conquest and the Colonial era. Winter term takes us to attempt longer and more contemporary texts. Some works read may be One Hundred Years of Solitude or Leafstorm by García Márquez. In the spring, though we typically begin with some short stories by such greats as Borges, Cortázar and María Luisa Bombal, we also delve into the world of film. This is an honors-level, year-long course and seniors may not drop in the spring.
MAT101
Algebra I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This is a course in first year algebra with emphasis on such topics as the properties of the real number system, solving first degree sentences in one variable, the fundamental operations involving polynomial and rational expressions, systems of linear equations in two variables, fractions, factoring, ratio, proportion, variation, exponents, roots, quadratic equations, and problem solving. All of the material of a typical first year of algebra will be completed as well as a variety of enrichment topics.
MAT102
Algebra I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This is designed for a student who has already studied some or much of the material that is covered in a typical first year algebra program, but who would benefit from additional work with the topics of Algebra I. The fall term is devoted to a review of the basic skills and ideas of Real Numbers, followed by single-variable equations and inequalities which then leads to work with linear relations and their applications in the late fall and winter. Students end the winter with the study of quadratic relations and their applications, and then spend the spring term on introductions to exponential relations, probability and statistics, and the idea of functions.
MAT201
Geometry
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT101/102 or the equivalent
This course is designed for students who would benefit from significant reinforcement of topics from Algebra I as they pertain to geometric problems. The emphasis in this course is on recognizing the geometric relationships in shapes and solids. New concepts are introduced using inductive reasoning and exploration. Students who complete this course will be preparedfor a 300-level course.
MAT202
Geometry
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT102 or the equivalent
This course integrates material from both plane and solid geometry. However, the development of the material requires extensive use of the skills and concepts already studiedin algebra. The major emphasis is the study of the properties of two and three dimensional geometric figures from both a deductive and inductive reasoning approach. Additional topics include material from analytic geometry, exercises in logic, the graphing of functions and relations and elementary trigonometry. Students who complete this course will be prepared fora 300-level course.
MAT203
Honors Geometry
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Outstanding ability in MAT101/102 or the equivalent
This is an enriched version of Math 202 and is designed for the well-qualified math student. The course covers the same geometric topics as Math 202 but in greater depth. Students investigate additional topics at the discretion of the instructor. Successful completion of this course normally advances a student to Math 303.
MAT301
Algebra II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT101/102 and MAT202/203
This course meets the standards of a solid course in second year algebra. However, it is designed for students whose background indicates a need for a review of material from previous courses. As such it moves at a somewhat slower pace than Math 302. Students who complete this course are prepared for a 400-level mathematics course.
MAT302
Algebra II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT101/102 and MAT202/203
This course is intended for students who have achieved success in Math 102 and Math 202 or the equivalent. The material is developed with an emphasis on the functional approach and most topics include a range of applied problems. The main focus of the course is the analytical development of the linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Other topics developed include an analysis of both the real and complex number systems, systems of equations in two and three variables, and an introduction to trigonometric functions. Students may take a 200-level and this 300-level course concurrently. Students who complete this course are prepared for a 400-level mathematics course.
MAT303
Honors Algebra II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT102/102 and MAT202/203
This is an enriched version of Math 302 and is designed for the well-qualified student. The course develops the same material as Math 302 but in greater depth. Students in this class are frequently asked to solve non-routine problems and to apply familiar concepts in new problem situations. Students may take a 200-level and this 300-level course concurrently.Successful completion of this course normally advances a student to Math 403.
MAT401
Precalculus & Statistics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT301/302 or the equivalent
This is intended as a follow-up to Algebra II or an equivalent course. It is designed to complete the study of the elementary functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric). Additionally, the course develops material from finite mathematics including an introduction to probability and statistics, and the normal distribution. Throughout the entire course modeling of real phenomena is emphasized.
MAT402
Precalculus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT302/303 or the equivalent
This is a follow up to Math 302 and as such continues the development of functions and relations. The course includes a thorough study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, an analytical development of conic sections, polar equations and graphs, matrices, and an introduction to data analysis. Calculator based graphing technology is incorporated into the course, and the instructional approach is greatly influenced by the fact that all students have immediate access to this technology.
MAT403
Honors Precalculus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT303 or the equivalent
This is designed as a continuation of Math 303. The topics covered in this accelerated course include all those listed under Math 402 but the pace is such that the material will becompleted by the end of the winter term. Successful completion of this course normally advances a student to Math 603 (AP Calculus BC).
MAT450
Discrete Math. & Precalculus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT401 or the equivalent
This course follows Math 401. It is also intended for students who have completed 402 andwho do not wish to study calculus at this time. This course provides a continued emphasis on the development of functions and relations, including a thorough study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and power functions. Further, data analysis and difference equations are used to model real world phenomena. Calculator and computer based graphing technology are incorporated into the course.
MAT501
Calculus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT402 or the equivalent
This course offers an introduction to the derivative and the integral. The pace of this course allows for a review of precalculus topics when necessary.
MAT502
AP Calculus AB
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT402 or the equivalent
This course follows the Advanced Placement AB syllabus, which incorporates an introduction to the derivative and the integral and their applications. Students in this course are required to take the AP exam in May.
MAT503
AP Calculus BC
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT 403 or the equivalent
This course follows the Advanced Placement BC syllabus, which incorporates an introduction to the derivative and the integral with their applications and work in infinite series. This four-term course, which begins in the spring term of the sophomore or junior year, is for students who are outstanding in mathematics. Open to students who have completedMath 403 or the equivalent, with permission of the department. Exceptional mathematics students entering Deerfield in the fall term with demonstrated excellence in precalculus may consult the mathematics chair as to placement in the fall. Students in this course are required to take the AP exam in May.
MAT503A
AP Calculus BC – Spr term
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT403 or the equivalent
This course follows the Advanced Placement BC syllabus, which incorporates an introduction to the derivative and the integral with their applications and work in infinite series. This four-term course, which begins in the spring term of the sophomore or junior year, is for students who are outstanding in mathematics. Open to students who have completedMAT402 or the equivalent, with permission of the department. Exceptional mathematics studentsentering Deerfield in the fall term with demonstrated excellence in precalculus may consult the mathematics chair as to placement in the fall. Students in this course are required to take the AP exam in May.
MAT510
AP Statistics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT303 with permission, or MAT401/402
This course follows the Advanced Placement Statistics syllabus, which introduces studentsto the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data by observing patterns and departures from patterns, planning a study by deciding what and how to measure, anticipating patterns by producing models using probability and simulation, and studying statistical inference by confirming models. May be taken concurrently with a 400-level or higher course. Students in this course are required to take the AP exam in May.
MAT602
Adv.Calc w Intro. to Multivar
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT502 or the equivalent
This course continues the study of single variable calculus and introduces topics from multivariable calculus. Topics may include understanding the relation of series and convergence to calculus, work with parametric, polar, and vector forms in more than two dimensions, optimization problems, advanced integration, and a broad introduction to differential equations. An open-source textbook and Sage, an open-source software package which does symbolic manipulation and advanced graphing, is used extensively in this course.
MAT603
Multivar. Calc. & Diff. Equ.
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT503 or the equivalent
This course covers the major topics of Multivariable Calculus, including optimization problems and vector calculus, and concludes with an introduction to ordinary differential equations. Mathematica, the symbolic mathematics software, is used extensively in the course for displaying 3D graphs, performing advanced numerical analysis, and analyzing nonlinear differential equations and systems of such equations. A licensed copy of the software is provided to all students.
MAT652
Fourier Analysis
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
BC Calculus
In this course we explore properties of Fourier series and prove the orthogonality of theFourier basis and the use of Fourier series in solving differential equations. We also explore the Fourier transform several related identities.
MAT704
Intro to Mathematical Proof
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Speer
P2
This is a one-term elective course designed to introduce students to the content, style, and structure of college-level, proof-based mathematics. We will explore topics in number theory and graph theory; additional topics may be added per the interests of the students or instructor. Along the way, students will learn the techniques of direct proof, proof by contradiction, proof by cases, and proof by induction. Students will also learn to typeset their work using the LaTeX markup language. Students in this course should be enrolled in BC Calculus or higher, and should intend to study math in college. It is expected that students have no prior experience with mathematical proof.
MAT705
Linear Algebra
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT503 or 600 or department permisison
Linear Algebra begins with the concept of systems of linear equations. From this foundation, Linear Algebra uses the mathematical objects and operations derived from vectors and matrices to construct a more abstract system of concepts that has broad relevance in higher mathematics as well as myriad practical applications. Topics studied include linear independence, subspaces, linear transformations, bases and dimension, orthogonality, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and matrix diagonalization. Applications investigated include simple economic models, predator-prey ecological models, cryptography, and Markov chains. This course may be taken concurrently with Math600.
MAT804
Harmonic Analysis
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This course focuses on developing a deep understanding of both Fourier series and the Fourier transform, while also using the study of those objects as natural equations to resolve introductory analysis questions like the difference between point-wise and uniform convergence and standard inequalities such as those of Young and Hölder. Hilbert spaces and convolutions arise naturally and receive a cursory treatment. Measure theory is dealt with ina limited way; enough to make sense of the idea of equivalence classes of integrable functions. Pre-requisite: completion of an advanced calculus or partial completion of an introductory analysis course, enough to provide comfort with with cluster points, compact sets, Cauchy sequences, and epsilon-delta proofs.
ONL100
Intro to Theater History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Choate Rosemary Hall teacher
ON
Students in this class travel back in time, as the Internet permits, to explore the changing form and function of theater throughout history. Through an analysis of significant productions – from The Bacchae at the Theater of Dionysus in 405 B.C. Athens, to the Noh theater in the shogun court of 14th century Japan, to Death of a Salesman on Broadway in 1949–¬ the course introduces students to key moments and movements in theater history. Students investigate developments in stage architecture, the changing styles and methods of production, and the shifting “place” of the stage within culture. In addition to their study of key scenes from representative plays, students examine materials ranging from set designs and costume sketches, to historical diaries and newspaper reviews. Students are required to participate with their teacher and classmates in online discussions, write a series of reaction pieces, and design a theater-of-the-future independent project. This course is taught by a teacher from Choate Rosemary Hall. Open to students from other Eight Schools Association (ESA) schools. Permission of the Academic Dean’s Office is required.
ONL102
Democracy, Media & Politics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Choate Rosemary Hall teacher
ON
All politics is now “mediated.” Radio, television and the Internet suffuse our culture and transform the presentation of issues, candidates and the American governmental system itself. To understand politics, one must understand the role media play in politics. After a brief review of the earliest techniques of political communication in Ancient Greece, this course examines the idea and practical impact of the First Amendment and 19th/early 20th century newspapering. It then considers the emergence of radio and the dominant medium of television from the 1930s to TV’s political golden epoch, the 1950s-1990s. The final unit of study focuses on the virtues and limitations of the digital age. Instructional techniques include readings, lectures, videos, essay writing, discussions, a blog and Internet work. This course is taught by a teacher from Choate Rosemary Hall. Open to students from other Eight Schools Association (ESA) schools. Permission of the Academic Dean’s Office is required.
ONL105
ESA Intro to Arabic (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Beginning Arabic is a team-taught online class that integrates synchronous and asynchronous web tools in teaching and learning. Students work with a variety of online mediato master the Arabic alphabet and sounds, build vocabulary, develop speaking and listening skills, and acquire grammar concepts at the basic level. Students learn how to speak about themselves, their families and their environment, to initiate and sustain conversations, and to compose several paragraphs related to their daily routine. Students also read authentic short texts on familiar topics and discuss their main ideas. This course focuses on Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to Levantine colloquial through music, songs, and short videos. By the end of the course, students gain a solid command of linguistic structures and skills in Modern Standard Arabic at the basic level as well as a deeper understanding and appreciation of Arab culture and art. Students’ progress is assessed through performance on weekly assignments and projects. This course is offered by the Eight Schools Association and is taught by a teacher from Choate Rosemary Hall and another from Deerfield Academy. It does not count as one of the five required courses Deerfield students must take each term; it alsodoes not satisfy the Deerfield language diploma requirement.
ONL106
ESA Begin. Attic Greek (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Beginning Attic Greek is a year-long collaborative online class which employs both synchronous and asynchronous web tools in teaching and learning. This course will not only introduce the vocabulary, forms, and syntax of Attic Greek, but also the thoughts, feelings, and actions that characterized Greek culture. When we say “Attic Greek,” we mean the Greek ofPericlean Athens, when the civilization was at its apex. We will use a mixture of online modules to provide grammatical and syntactical lessons along with textbook work to supply grammatical practice and readings in authentic Greek. Additionally, we will be using a suite of web-enhanced tools and applications to connect students at different ESA peer institutionsin their endeavor to learn Attic Greek together. The course will feature project-based and collaborative assessments, using both translation and composition. Students will submit weekly work for assessment and self-evaluation to chart their own progress. There will also be some self-directed research projects which will allow students to explore individual interests. It does not count as one of the five required courses Deerfield students must takeeach term; it also does not satisfy the Deerfield language diploma requirement. SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT
ONL400
ESA Destrution of Slavery(p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
In the Destruction of American Slavery will consider how the Republican Party dealt with issues of slavery and race from 1850-1870. Students will examine a wide variety of primary source documents in the course of each week and engage with the scholarship of Lincoln Prize-winning historian James Oakes. The discussions will strive to place the Republicans in the context of their day, offering particular attention to the often-complicated legal arguments that preceded the formal abolition of slavery in 1865. At the center of the course is the much debated question of “who freed the slaves?” This course will be taught online with students from member schools of the Eight Schools Association. The class will be taught by Lawrenceville teacher Dr. Chaput, with discussions and student collaboration occurring online during the week. This one-term course is open to juniors and seniors. It does not count as one of the five required courses Deerfield students must take each term; it also does not satisfy the Deerfield language diploma requirement. SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT
PHI200
Ethics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
What is “the good life?” How do you define “right” and “wrong”? What do you do when confronted with an important decision that pits “right vs. right”? Students explore and sharpen their own moral reasoning as they investigate the strengths and weaknesses of major ethical theories. The class grapples with the ideas of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle,Mill, Kant, Bentham, and Hobbes. Class discussions focus on the applications of theories to ethical issues and personal stories. Assessment includes analytical writing and independent research projects.
PHI300
Eastern Philosophy
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
“The more you know, the less you understand.” Lao Tzu. Together we will explore the incredibly rich landscape of Eastern philosophy. While deceptively simple, our texts invariably lead to meaningful self-discovery and insights about the world. The students will be asked to consider the significance and relevance of these perspectives. Can they help us navigate our own lives? Have they subtly influenced western thought when we were not looking?Along with the classic texts of Western interpretation, we will consider works such as Zen inthe Art of Archery, Tao Te Ching, What the Buddha Taught, and The Analects of Confucius.
PHI407
Lives of Meaning
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Flaska
P3
Lives of Meaning heeds the call of Socrates, to examine our life and to live it well. Lives of Meaning reminds us of the appeal of Dorothy Day, to nourish both body and soul with food and introspection. Participants will consider the great questions of human existence andexperience, acknowledging many paths to a transformative destination, and many names for thatunified and essential presence somewhere beyond this moment, seeking to be known. By way of metaphor, this class will be on a journey: Deerfield Academy as our vehicle, and we are navigators. Thomas Keating, the celebrated Deerfield Academy alumnus claims “just by the verynature of our birth, we are on a spiritual journey.” Creative writing, detailed dialogue, introspective retreats and wandering walks will complement our readings. Texts will include writings by Teresa of Avila, Wendell Berry, Dorothy Day, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Thomas Merton and Henri Nouwen, while we reconnect with the wisdom and enriching power of reflectionthrough a variety of contemplative practices.
PHI600
Political Philosophy
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Should there be a government? If so, what should be its responsibilities? What should be the extent of its authority? This course explores classic and contemporary debates in political philosophy. The students undertake a rigorous and critical examination of classic texts on issues such as leadership, justice, civil disobedience, human rights, and social contract theory. Texts by influential political theorists (including Sophocles, Plato, Locke,Marx, Nietzsche, Rawls) supplement a discussion of present day issues. Lively class discussions and independent research projects help students develop their ability to merge politics and philosophy.
PHI611
Understanding the Holocaust
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Baker
P7
The Holocaust was the purposeful and highly systematic attempt to annihilate human beingson a scale never seen before or since; more particularly, the Nazis sought to destroy the entire Jewish population on the European continent. In examining the Holocaust this course raises some essential questions about society and humanity. It is a journey into the heart ofdarkness, a tour of the most heinous set of actions in recorded human history. It is also a testimony to the indomitable human spirit, to the will to live, to courage, compassion and empathy. Whether discussing experiments on obedience to authority, watching documentaries on the horrors of the extermination camps, reading accounts by perpetrators, victims, survivors,bystanders and rescuers, this course will present you with some of the most unsettling issuesyou will confront in your education. May also be taken as HIS611.
PHI614
Existentialism: Live Dangerous
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mrs. O’Donnell & Mr. O’Donnell
P2 P7
One of the most interesting philosophical and literary movements of the last 150 years, Existentialism confronts the challenges of everyday human existence. Close reading, formal and informal writing, collaborative projects and lively discussion facilitated by a teaching team grapple with the problems of identity, personal responsibility, freedom, faith, and meaning in face of the absurdity of existence. In addition to the most prominent figures—Sartre, Camus, de Beauvoir, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard—an international cohort of writers may include Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Melville, Hawthorne, Kafka, Unamuno, and Tillich. A nod to the great pre-existentialist, Plato, establishes a foundation for our multicultural and cross-disciplinary perspectives and productions. May also be taken as ENG614
REL200
The Bible
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Flaska
P4
This course examines themes in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures. A close reading of selected sections of the Bible provides the basis for examination of the historical and ethical significance of this literature, while an introduction to the linguistic dimension ofthe Greek New Testament provides opportunity for advanced study.
REL300
Native America
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
“My friend, I am going to tell you the story of my life.” With these words, Black Elk retrospectively compounds deeply experienced Native sorrow with a profound reverence for all life, in whatever form and color it may come. It is true that Native people inhabited the Americas well before the “white man” arrived from Europe on large ships in the 16th century. The contributions of Native cultures are inextricably tied to the American story, and few regions are as ripe for inquiry in this regard as Deerfield. This course begins to tell the story of Native peoples through their history, their spirituality and their present lives on reservations. Particular attention will be given to the Native populations that consider the land of their people to be in the New England states and southeastern Canadian provinces. During the fall vacation in November students will be invited to participate in a multi-day off-campus cultural immersion experience in Arkansas and Oklahoma, as guests of the Cherokee and Cree communities.
REL400
Religions of the World
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The course begins with an examination and analysis of religious questions in the broadestsense. What is religion? What does religion attempt to explain? How can one be a “successful”adherent to this tradition? Students then survey major world religions: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Class discussion and independent reading focus on the great books of these religions in an attempt to discover both the common and the unique elements.
REL608
From Auschwitz to Ramallah
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
During the fall term we will study the Holocaust, the Nazis’ purposeful and highly systematic attempt to destroy the entire Jewish population of Europe. Examining the Holocaustis a journey into the heart of darkness, a tour of the most heinous actions in recorded history. It is as well a testimony to the indomitable human spirit, to courage, compassion and empathy. The Holocaust also served as a key impetus for the creation of Israel in 1948. This tiny strip of land has been the setting for one of the most intractable conflicts of thepast 75 years. It is a place that two cultures fiercely call their homeland and that sits at the epicenter of turmoil in the Middle East. In the winter and spring terms we will explore how Israeli and Palestinian cultures have created and sustained narratives of their history and identity that lock them in conflict. We will read Palestinian and Israeli writings, watchfilms from each culture, dig deeply into historical material, study both Judaism and Islam, and follow current events. During spring break, we will travel to Israel/Palestine to deepen our work on site. We will seek to understand this conflict that has resulted in four wars, anoccupation and two uprisings, the resurgence of Anti-Semitism, conceptions about terrorism and bitter debates in governments, organizations, and campuses around the world. May also be taken as HIS608. SELECTION WILL BE MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT. THIS CLASS INLCUDES REQUIRED SPRING BREAK TRIP TO ISRAEL/PALESTINE.
ANA401
Anatomy & Physiology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Biology
This course is an in-depth treatment of the musculoskeletal, nervous, and cardiovascular systems using pathology to provide perspective on normal form and function. Students explore the systems from both a functional and clinical perspective using prosected specimens, radiographic imaging, and electronic monitoring devices such as ECG. Grades are based on weekly assessments, in-class clinical presentations, class participation, and end-of-term exams.
AST401
Exploring the Cosmos
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This two-term introductory astronomy course explores the origin, evolution and fate of our universe, the rules that govern its contents, and how we observe it. Topics may include the nature of science, key physics concepts, astronomical observation, the solar system, other planetary systems, stars, exotic objects (like black holes and supernovae), galaxies, and cosmology. The course format incorporates group work, student projects, student presentations, online guest visits by astronomers, extensive use of the planetarium, and observations with the school’s various telescopes. Students will develop useful skills, including effective collaboration, how to communicate science accessibly, and critical analysis of scientific claims. The objective of the course is for students to leave with a better understanding of and enthusiasm for astronomy and it’s role in our daily lives, as well as the ability to follow astronomical developments throughout their lives.
AST600
Astrophysics Research
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Phy 1A or AP excellence, AP Calc enrollment, or permission
This is a three-term research course in which student teams conduct a year-long investigation in astrophysics or cosmology. Astrophysics is an effort to understand how everything in the universe works, from black holes to galaxies. Cosmology is a study of the nature of the universe itself that addresses questions like, “How did the universe begin?” and “What is the ultimate fate of the universe?” This course will begin with a survey of fascinating topics in astrophysics and cosmology. This survey will serve to spark interests and questions students may like to pursue through research. Students will then work in groupsusing quantitative research methods to investigate questions of interest to the group using existing data. Examples of potential projects include modeling exploding stars (supernovae) that can briefly outshine entire galaxies, and using galaxy clusters as cos mic telescopes tostudy the first galaxies to form in the universe over 13 billion years ago. Students in this course will develop skills that will serve them in a variety of career paths, including research methods, critical analysis of other’s research, effective collaboration, and how to communicate one’s work accessibly. Students will leave this course with a better understanding of the field of astronomical research generally, as well as an in-depth understanding of their chosen topics and those of other groups.
BIO400
Biology I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry
This course introduces students to biology from the level of organic molecules, to cells,tissues, organisms, populations, communities, ecosystems, and the biosphere. The major themesof the course include form and function, inheritance, ecological interactions with the environment, system feedback and regulation, energy and metabolism, unity and diversity, adaptation, and evolution. Students are expected to attend and participate in laboratories, collaborate, critically assess data, and present findings to the class. Grades are determinedby assessments, lab reports, and in-class presentations.
BIO403
Biology I Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry
Biology IA is a comprehensive introductory course intended for students who have a high level of interest in science and have demonstrated strong study skills. The themes of the unity and diversity of life provide the conceptual framework of the course and emphasis is placed on developing laboratory skills, collaboration and critical thinking. Students may elect to take the SAT II subject test upon completion of the course.
BIO500
AP Biology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry 1A or department permission
Advanced Placement Biology is a demanding, double period course designed for students with high aptitude and a strong interest in science. The principles of Biology are developed in depth in accordance with the course syllabus issued by the College Board. Emphasis is placed on inquiry-based laboratory activities and student-centered projects that complement the lectures and discussions. Students are expected to take the AP Biology examination upon completion of the course. Course meets during double period.
BIO600
Orthopaedic Biomechanics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Biology & instructor permission
Excellence in science
This course is designed to involve students in all aspects of orthopedic research, including literature searches, critical reading, experimental protocol design and execution, computer modeling, data collection and analysis, and multimedia presentations. Delving into the overlap between anatomy and engineering, students will work in small teams based on common interests, share daily workloads and develop their own specialties within the group. Topics have included meta-analyses of intimate partner violence, child abuse and elder abuse,as well as modeling bruise mechanics, fracture likelihood, and arthropod skeletal mechanics. Course expectations include working as a group collaboratively and yet independently, generating weekly progress reports, and poster and manuscript production. This course also requires team work outside of standard class hours and might include collaboration with professionals beyond Deerfield.
BIO602
Molecular Biology Research
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Biology or Biology 1A & instructor permission
Molecular Biology Research is an upper level research course intended for students who have a strong background in the sciences, and who wish to gain college-level research experience in molecular biology. Molecular biology, the inquiry into how life functions on a molecular level, has given us the tools to treat disease, and to make great advances in forensics and agriculture worldwide. Bio/Chem*** will allow students to immerse themselves inunderstanding the molecular machines and genetic codes that make life happen. Students will practice molecular biology from the beginning of the fall term, at first building the foundations of their research techniques, and then moving on to projects of their own design.Projects might involve investigation of a protein involved in disease, mutating a bacterial strain to alter its metabolism, combining pieces of genes to create a protein with a novel function or investigating how a small molecule elicits a response in a cell. All projects will stem from individual student interests and will develop with support from the instructor. Independent projects culminate in a written scientific paper and a presentation in a research forum that will be open to the DA community.
BIO620
Experimental Neurology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Bio, or Bio 1A and instructor permission
Experimental Neurology conceptually studies cell physiology, neurotransmitter biochemistry and neuroanatomy with application to modeling human addiction and disease. Experimentally, students explore mechanisms of signaling and regulating gene expression in Drosophila neurons using transgenic and optogenetic technologies. A major focus of the courseis on experimental design, data analysis and scientific writing.
CHE300
Chemistry I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Physics I/IA and Algebra I
This course enables students to develop an understanding of the fundamental properties ofmatter that provides the foundation for the development of quantitative models of chemical systems. Laboratory work, guided inquiry learning, group discussion and lecture are integrated into most aspects of the year’s work. Students who do exceptionally well in this course may elect to take the SAT II Chemistry test.
CHE303
Chemistry I Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Physics 1A or concurrent Algebra II or H Geometry
The course is intended for students with a high aptitude and genuine interest in science and math. Chemistry I Accelerated emphasizes inquiry learning through the development of problem solving and laboratory skills. Students may elect to take the SAT II Chemistry test.
CHE500
AP Chemistry
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Phys 1A, Chem & Algebra II or permission via placement test
This course is for students with a strong interest in science and exceptional quantitative skills. The course is equivalent to an introductory chemistry class at the college level and the major objective is to deeply learn and understand the fundamentals of chemistry. Students are expected to take the AP exam upon completion of this course. Course meets during double period.
GEO401
The Geology of Deerfield
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Mr. Harcourt
P1
When we “look to the hills,” we see the striking natural beauty that has inspired generations of Deerfield students. Closer examination of the topography-first described by Deerfield Academy Head of School and geologist Rev. Edward Hitchcock in the early 1800s-reveals a rich history of continental collision, violent rifting, Jurassic dinosaurs and ice age remodeling. Lectures will focus on the geologic story revealed in the bedrock andglacial deposits of Deerfield, and field trips focus on several local sites that provide excellent illustrations of the topics discussed in class.
PHY200
Physics I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
This is an introductory physics course. Through guided inquiry, group discussion, and hands on investigations students will come to a functional understanding of the principles ofphysics. We study phenomena including mechanics, electricity and magnetism, optics and others. Students create their own experiments, test their ideas, engineer and build their own structures and communicate their ideas to others. This course focuses on the concepts, principles, and ways of thinking that will underlie students’ further study of science.
PHY203
Physics I Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Algebra I
This is an introductory physics course with an emphasis on data collection and analysis. Through guided inquiry, group discussions, and hands on investigations students will come to a functional understanding of the principles of physics. Students will investigate phenomena from the major themes of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, optics and others. Students will create their own experiments and be pushed to uncover, explain and extend patterns and principles in nature. This will be done through extensive use of computer-based data acquisition and analysis.
PHY402
Electric Vehicle Engineering
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Physics
Throughout the fall and winter terms, students in this class will convert a 6-wheeled amphibious utility vehicle to run on electrical power. In the spring, students will engage inthe essential step of ensuring maximum efficiency and safety of the vehicle by completing extensive testing of the componentry. This course offers students a unique opportunity both to problem solve practical designs, and to bring their ideas to fruition through the hands-onconstruction and implementation of their ideas. Students will be assessed on their ability tocollaborate effectively, demonstrate independence, resilience, and time management. Additionally, students will study topics including gear ratios, thermodynamics, DC motors, fuses, switches, motor controllers, variable resistors, rolling resistance, battery charging,battery management, torque, amperage draw, energy efficiency. This course requires students to spend a significant amount of time outside of the daily class schedule working in the garage.
PHY501
Advanced EV Engineering
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Electric Vehicle Engineering
Advanced Electric Vehicle Engineering is a two-trimester course offered to students who have demonstrated a keen interest and proficiency in Physics II: EV Engineering. This course will be offered to those who have already completed the conversion of a vehicle from an internal combustion engine to an electric motor. Students will measure the efficiency of the vehicle and make necessary modifications to maximize, torque, velocity, runtime and maneuverability. Possible areas of concentration include, but are not limited to: solar power, efficiency and effectiveness of tracks vs. wheels, testing gear ratios to determine maximumvelocity vs. torque capabilities, and efficiency and effectiveness of charging options.
PHY502
AP Physics 2
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Algebra II & prev. physics course, or instructor permission
This is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as fluids; thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Emphasis is placed on developing more sophisticated experimental and data-analysis techniques. Students are expected to take the AP Physics 2 exam and will be prepared to take the SAT Physics Subject Test upon completion of the course.
PHY550
AP Physics C
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Past or current Calculus BC and first year physics
This is a second year course for students who have a serious interest in studying physicsbeyond the introductory level. The AP syllabus is followed as the major themes of physics arestudied in detail through lecture, laboratory and demonstration. This course regularly uses double periods, and the out of class work can be extensive and demanding. Students are expected to take the AP Physics examination. Course meets during double period.
PHY600
Robotics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Concurrent Precalculus
This course is rooted in the idea that people learn best when actively engaged in projects that are sustained, personally meaningful, and enjoyable. Students learn the fundamental electronics, computer-aided design (CAD), 3-D printing, and coding in C to be able to build autonomous vehicles. Students engage in collaborative design challenges that drive them to learn problem solving, teamwork, and debugging skills.
SCI410
Forensics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Dr. Cullinane
P2 P3
Forensics deals with the reconstruction of evidence as it is typically involved in criminal investigations. The focus of this course is on evidence-based analyses of child abuse, intimate partner violence, and elder abuse, as well as comparing and contrasting psychopathy and sociopathy. Students will study the profiles of common perpetrators, modi operandi, and symptoms of abuse in these respective victims’ profiles, finishing with a unit on serial killer profiling. Grades are based on an expectation of significant class participation, weekly quizzes, and writing assignments. The culminating experience involves an in-class presentation and manuscript on a detailed aspect of forensics science.
SCI500
AP Seminar: Global H2O
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Sophomores may be eligible with permission of the instructor
Clean water is essential for the living world and the global economy, but in many areas the supply of uncontaminated water is in danger of disappearing. In this AP Seminar course students explore the environmental, social and economic issues associated with the worldwide struggle to acquire clean water. As part of the AP Capstone Program of the College Board, theAP Seminar course challenges students to guide their own inquiry process as they learn to askgood research questions, understand and analyze arguments, evaluate multiple perspectives, synthesize ideas, collaborate effectively, communicate persuasively using written and oral expression, and reflect on their learning and skill development. AP Seminar: Global H2O Resources is an interdisciplinary course designed to foster inquiry, global awareness, scholarship and creativity. Students examine the a viability and use of clean water at local,national, and global levels by means of investigative case studies, debates, independent and collaborative projects, chemistry lab work, and field trips to local sites. Students who takeAP Seminar are eligible to pursue a capstone project during senior year in the AP Research course. May also be taken as History: HIS500.
SCI501
AP Seminar:Global Food Systems
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Sophomores may be eligible with permission of the instructor
In this AP Seminar course students explore the complexity of global food systems while developing their skills as critical thinkers and global citizens. The course focuses on localand global issues related to agriculture and food production, nutrition and culture, and hunger and food insecurity. As part of the AP Capstone Program, the AP Seminar course challenges students to guide their own inquiry process as they learn to ask good research questions, understand and analyze arguments, evaluate multiple perspectives, synthesize ideas, collaborate effectively, communicate persuasively using written and oral expression, and reflect on their learning and skill development. Throughout this interdisciplinary course, students will deepen their understanding of food systems through debates, seminar discussions, independent research, collaborative projects, oral presentations, guest speakers, scientific inquiry, and field trips to local farms and food producers. Students will take advantage of Pioneer Valley’s rich agricultural heritage, Deerfield Academy’s award winning dining hall, and other contacts in the valley and around the world as they seek out and analyze divergent perspectives about food systems and their environmental, economic, cultural, and health impacts. Students will be challenged to move from ideas to action as they analyze systems, identify problems and propose solutions related to food around the globe andon their plates. Most of the second half of the year will be spent working on a team project and individual research-based essay as part of the College Board Assessments for AP Seminar. May be taken as History: HIS501
SCI510
AP Environmental Science
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry or department permission
Advanced Placement Environmental Science is a challenging double-period course designed for students with a strong interest in environmental issues. The central theme of global sustainability is developed through lectures and debates and specific topics are explored by means of case studies, laboratory activities and field trips to local sites. The material is multi-disciplinary in nature and students are encouraged to draw upon a wide range of academic resources, including readings in sociology, ethics, economics, law and ecology. Students are expected to take the AP Environmental Science examination. Course meets during double period.
SCI691
Research in Sustainability
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry
The population of humanity is predicted to soon approach 9 billion and to be largely urban. The questions of how to provide clean air, clean water, and food in efficient, sustainable ways are pressing. Students design and carry out experimental, data-driven investigations into future solutions that could enhance human living environments. These projects will be driven by student interest and can be biological or chemical in nature or they could focus on designing computer control or sensing systems. At the end of the winter term, each student presents an academic paper that summarizes the research process, the findings and the implications of the results of the study.