Course Catalog

Use the filters below to sort through all of Deerfield’s course offerings. Please note that Period numbers only apply to spring electives.

ENG200
Classic and Contemporary Lit
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The freshman course seeks to engender creativity in thinking, reading, and writing.
Students read a diverse collection of short stories, The Odyssey, a contemporary novel, a
Shakespeare play, and a selection of poetry to foster their close reading skills and literary
sensibilities. Students encounter a range of writing assignments to develop formal and
informal writing skills and to improve vocabulary and grammar. All freshmen deliver a
literary reading and participate in a poetry contest.
ENG201
The Scholar’s Craft (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The path to becoming a successful scholar can be hard to navigate alone. This course
helps students recognize and practice the skills necessary to succeed in the classroom and
beyond. Topics covered in the course include time management, organization, note-taking,
annotation, memorization, concentration, test preparation, reading comprehension, research
skills, and listening strategies. Students take this hands-on, pass/fail course, which meets
three times a week, in addition to their five core subjects.
ENG300
Defining Literary Traditions
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Sophomore English emphasizes critical reading, focused discussions, and a variety of
writing assignments connected to the study of literature derived from the British tradition.
Close reading assignments and class discussions encourage students to analyze and to
appreciate the elements of literature. Teachers choose core texts from works by Chaucer,
Shakespeare, the Romantic poets, a 19th-century novelist, a contemporary author, and a modern
playwright. Sophomores also select, memorize, and deliver a declamation from a literary work.
ENG330
The Writer’s Craft (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Before encountering the demands of extended essays and narratives, students meet one
period a week to review and reinforce essential composition skills, including questioning
evidence, forming and structuring arguments, sustaining unity, varying syntactical patterns,
understanding punctuation, and revising drafts. In a workshop setting, the students receive
individual attention and also learn to judge their work more critically. Students take this
exercise-intensive pass/fail course in addition to English 300. (Open to returning sophomores
only – Freshman teachers identify candidates.) Must commit to both terms.
ENG500
American Dreams
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The American Dream is a familiar phrase, but what does it mean? Whose dream is it? Is
there just one dream for all Americans? How has it evolved over time? Do considerations of
gender, race, ethnicity, or class affect the pursuit of this dream? To gain an understanding
of how the pursuit of the distinctive American Dream helped to shape the culture and
literature of the United States, students examine texts from different genres and time
periods. Texts may include Rebecca Harding Davis’s Life in the Iron Mills, Nella Larsen’s
Passing, Horatio Alger’s Ragged Dick, and short stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Anzia
Yezierska.
ENG501
American Nature
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Nature is a seemingly simple, but paradoxical word that refers both to the environment
outside us and to human qualities inside us. On our journey to explore the connection between
place and character in America, we visit the Great Plains, the Pacific Northwest, New England
, the South, Detroit and New York City with authors like Cather, Kesey, Hawthorne, Thoreau,
Emerson, Dickinson, Oliver, Morrison, Whitman, Hughes, and Fitzgerald serving as our guides.
Along the way, we pursue different kinds of creative and critical writing and go on monthly
field trips into the natural world around Deerfield.
ENG502
American Identities
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

America is made up of a patchwork of ethnicities, races, religions, and personal
experiences. As the country has grown over the past 250 years, individuals have struggled to
find their personal identities in the midst of America forming its own collective cultural
and political identity on the world stage. We will examine the experiences of a variety of
both native and immigrant Americans as they come of age in the melting pot that is America.
How are the varied journeys writers and their characters take in forming their personal
identities informed by and affected by their status as citizens of the United States? We will
examine works by authors such as Nella Larsen, Ralph Ellison, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toni
Morrison, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nathanial Hawthorne, Junot Diaz, Willa Cather, Mark Twain,
Frank McCourt, Sandra Cisneros, Sherman Alexie, WEB DuB ois, Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes
.
ENG503
American Studies
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This is an interdisciplinary course combining American Literature and honors-level United
States History. The course fulfills both the junior English and History requirements, and
prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in United States History. In a team-taught
double period, students examine the social, economic, political, and cultural heritage of the
United States through a combination of primary documents, interpretive secondary sources and
representative works of American literature and art. Close, critical analysis, responsible
oral discourse, and expository writing are emphasized. American Studies is team-taught and
meets for a double period.
ENG505
American Heroes
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The Oxford English Dictionary calls a hero “a man (or occas. a woman) of superhuman
strength, courage, or ability, favored by the gods; esp. one regarded as semi-divine and
immortal.” This term comes down to us from Classical mythology and history, yet both the word
“hero” and the notion of heroism loom particularly large in the American context and
imagination. So, what does the American hero look like? What are the qualities or
circumstances that render someone a hero? Can a hero indeed be a “she,” as the OED suggests
can, occasionally, be the case? Is there such a thing as an “antihero,” a person defined by a
lack of heroic attributes? With attention to fiction, nonfiction, oratory, film, drama, and
poetry, this course will explore exactly these questions. In addition to core texts by
Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, and Fitzgerald, our texts may include speeches by
Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King, Jr., short fiction by Ernest Hemingway and Junot Diaz
, drama by Arthur Miller, longer works by Ken Kesey, Toni Morrison, James Dickey, Margaret
Atwood, Karen Russell.
ENG540
American Stages
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

American writers continue to expose the tension between the conventional and
unconventional impulses as individuals struggle to find their place in or apart from a larger
community. The clashes play powerfully on the stage or screen, and by adding those genres to
their exploration of the American character, students encounter the gender and economic
tensions in Lynn Nottage’s Ruined, love’s deceptions in Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar
Named Desire, the deadening social conformity in Edith Wharton’s novel The Age of Innocence
and Martin Scorsese’s film adaptation, the decadent American dreams in Francis Ford Coppola’s
The Godfather, and the battle between intolerance and redemptive love in Tony Kushner’s
Angels in America.
ENG560
American Voices
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

In addition to the core texts, Gatsby, Huck Finn, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, we will
also use a wide range of American short stories and novels to sample the many voices and
issues that have populated American literature. Students will encounter writers ranging from
Edith Wharton and Nathaniel Hawthorne in the 19th century to Ernest Hemingway, John Updike
and Toni Morrison in the 20th. The variety of story styles and ideas helps students to
understand better how literature has changed over time and to hone their analytical skills by
discussing how the stories work. The purpose of the course is to provide a breadth of
exposure as well as a chance to sample modern literature.
ENG610
Future Shock: Contemp. Lit.
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The ground-breaking “dystopian” novels of the 20th Century, such as Orwell’s 1984,
Huxley’s Brave New World and Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, have produced an extraordinary and
growing body of literature that imagines future worlds shaped by current trends, for better
and worse. What kind of societies will cyberspace, genetic engineering, emerging technologies
, climate change, terrorism, population growth and resource wars produce? What will be the
fate of the institutions and ideals that presently define us? What will happen to our
fundamental notions of liberty, the individual, and human relationships? Will human beings
flourish or fail? This course will examine these questions through several of the finest
recent literary dystopias and will approach the reading in a primarily seminar-style,
discussion format. Writing assignments will be predominantly creative responses to the
reading, with an occasional foray into relevant essays, short stories and films. Possible
texts include Cloud Atlas, by David Mitchell; Oryx and Crake, by Margaret Atwood; The Road,
by Cormac McCarthy; The Dazzle of Day, by Molly Gloss; Fiskadoro, by Denis Johnson; Riddley
Walker, by Russell Hoban.
ENG613
The Modern Temper: Oxford
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

What does it mean to be “modern”? And how did the aesthetic of Modernism shape the
literature of the 20th century? The course will begin around 1880 and end around 1940 at the
beginning of the Second World War. The European war of 1914-1918 marked significant changes
within American and British society; this class will look closely at different attempts to
register these changes in literature, as the emerging “Modernist” culture reflected the
alienation and uncertainty of the post-war generation. Texts may include works by Thomas
Hardy, Joseph Conrad, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott
Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Rebecca West, Ford Maddox Ford, Virginia Woolf, Evelyn Waugh,
and Kazuo Ishiguro. Students will prepare an independent learning project in which they write
a research paper exploring the significance of on e element of modernist expression of their
choice. During the two weeks of spring break, we will take our study to Oxford, where we will
explore the background of many of these works, deepening our understanding through lectures,
and taking the opportunity to have our work examined by experts.
ENG615
City Lights
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

City lights have been beckoning men and women for millennia. Freed from cultivating the
land and in search of opportunity, more than 50 percent of the world’s population live in
cities today, and there is no end to this trend nor to the city’s central role in our
experience of modernity. The literature and critical questions of this seminar will grow from
the character of cities, both as geographical location and cultural production, as it is and
has been both represented by thinkers and authors through time and featured in each of our
own experiences. Some familiar and not so familiar authors will guide us through the streets
of New York (Teju Cole, Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Malcolm X, Alfred Kazin, E.B. White)
to which we will compare and contrast Shakespeare’s London and contextualized Venice,
crossroads of east and west, in his controversial The Merchant of Venice. We will make a
field trip to Lower Manhattan before the course returns to London in works by such diverse
authors as Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, William Blake, Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot. In early
winter, we travel to the French countryside to deepen the course’s theoretical perspective by
imagining with Gustave Flaubert’s Emma Bovary the poignantly nicknamed “City of Lights”
itself: Paris. This course begins with an extended, intensive focus on various forms of
expressive writing. Short nonfiction and fiction readings will serve as models, but the
emphasis will be on the writing process.
ENG618
Poetry Now!
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This class presents students with the opportunity to engage with poetry as it exists in
the world today. The class will focus on individual poems and books of poems by young, active
poets from the Pioneer Valley, the United States, and around the world. Through reading,
discussion, and a series of critical and comparative papers, the class will arrive at an
understanding of the many ways in which poets are, in the present, transforming the poetic
art. Though coursework is largely analytical and descriptive in nature, students will at
times have the opportunity to apply and develop their critical understanding of poetry
through creative work. When possible, we will communicate directly with the poets whose work
we are reading, taking the opportunity to ask questions and learn what makes poetry exciting
for poets who are living and writing today. By the end of the term, students should be
confident readers of contemporary poetry in print and on the internet, prepared to engage
actively in the ongoing conversation that surrounds the art.
ENG621
Literature and Form
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course investigates the evolution of literary forms through two questions: what is
the relationship between old and new? And what is the influence of form on meaning? In broad
strokes that follow the arc of time while touching down on seminal texts, we will begin with
vibrant contemporary poetry and prose and then cast ourselves far back in time, looking at
early forms of storytelling and communication, following the transition from oral to literate
culture, investigating the development of increasingly varied and complex forms, and then
immersing ourselves in the boundary-breaking inventiveness of the 20th century–all before
reconsidering the chaotic present in the context of the past. In each era we will ask: how
does the memory of the past inform the vision of the future? Students will write critically
and creatively, pairing formal analyses with the ir own experimental prose and verse.
Readings will partner classic literature with contemporary writers. Texts will include poetry
by Eliot, Dickinson, Pound, Whitman, and folk poets of Greece and Afghanistan; drama by
Sophocles, Shakespeare, and Stoppard; novels by Calvino, Woolf, and others; works in
translation; and readings by Gleick, Pinker, Tolkein, Emerson, and Moretti.
ENG622
Jazz Age and Lost Generation
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Paris, Harlem, Greenwich Village: Why were these places such powerful magnets for a
generation of writers, artists, and musicians? Students will discover how a diverse range of
Americans at home and abroad responded to the cultural climate of the 1920s, a decade
characterized by enormous artistic upheaval in the midst of a balloon of economic prosperity.
Special attention will be paid to the space Paris, Harlem, and Greenwich Village occupied in
the cultural imagination of the 1920s. Students will not only study literature but also how
jazz has shaped modernism in American poetry and fiction. Among the writers students will
encounter will be James Joyce, Sherwood Anderson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway,
Langston Hughes, William Faulkner, Claude McKay, Gertrude Stein, and Jean Toomer. Writing
assignments will include personal and analytical essays, as well as creative pieces inspired
by modernist models.
ENG624
Love Stories
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

From the time we are children, we are bombarded with love stories—in songs, in films, and
in advertisements—so that most of us, male and female alike, have an idea of what it means to
fall in love even before it happens. We have absorbed the patterns and tropes, yet so many of
the great love stories of world literature defy these. While we assume love is eternal, it is
also deeply cultural and ideological. Artists, poets, philosophers, theologians,
psychologists, all have fought through time to establish their definitive take on the subject
. This course will tackle the most provocative treaties, drama, verse and narratives written
about love and friendship. We will begin with Plato’s Symposium that gave us the notion of
Platonic Love and a few representative tales from the courtly romantic tradition of medieval
France that introduced and shaped notions of romantic love. We will then be prepared to
critique and analyze the theme from the early-modern in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice
and beyond in works such as Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita and
throughout Jeffrey Eugenides’ wonderfully selected stories in My Mistresses Sparrow is Dead:
Great Love Stories from Chekov to Munro. You will sharpen your careful reading and critical
analysis through regular informal and formal writing. The senior meditation will develop by
way of The New York Times weekly Modern Love column and other timely prose models.
ENG625
Central Questions
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

When Hamlet asks, “To be, or not to be? That is the question,” he utters what has become,
unfortunately, a cliché. In the context of Shakespeare’s play, however, this question ripples
with Hamlet’s anxiety, with his wondering as to how (or whether) he should move forward with
his life. This course will explore works, like Hamlet, characterized by protagonists who
grapple with similar “central questions,” questions like: What defines me? What does it mean
to be a good daughter/son? To what extent has my family, race, ethnicity, and/or choices
determined my future? To what extent do I have the power to make my own choices at all? How
do people see me? Which path should I take? These questions are visceral and real to the
characters we will encounter; yet, the asking of big questions is not (or certainly shouldn’t
be) something done only by fictio nal characters. To that end, at the same time that the
class will be analyzing these figures and their defining questions, students will be keeping
journals in which they will log their day-to-day experiences. In the winter, as students
approach the writing of their meditations, each will read his/her own journal as a text, and,
in so doing, isolate the questions that emerge as central in their own lives. This course is
designed to exercise the skills of analysis, critical thinking, and writing, as well as the
practice of regular self-reflection. Authors may include Shakespeare, Faulkner, Woolf,
Ellison, Robinson, Smith, Hamid, Erdrich.
ENG630
Creative Writing Workshop
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This advanced workshop is for accomplished writers who want to develop their craft by
experimenting in a variety of genres: poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction, personal
vignettes, and meditations. In class, students discuss the work of published authors,
practice different techniques, critique their peers’ work, and develop rewriting skills.
Texts include The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry, Finbar’s Hotel, What If?, and
The Things They Carried.
ENG640
Reading Insanity: Am I Crazy?
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course seeks to explore the concept of sanity and those to whom the label “crazy”
has often been attached. Through close-readings of texts that vary across genre and
historical lines, we will confront a series of complex and often overlapping questions: What
are the telltale signs of insanity, and who defines the criteria for determining it? What
sorts of power relations are implicit in such decisions? Is it possible to be “crazy” at one
moment, but wholly sane in the next? What happens when one willfully inhabits the label? Are
there any scenarios within which insanity might actually be a desirable condition? In
articulating responses to these and other questions, students will develop improved reading,
writing, and critical thinking skills. Texts will include fiction, poetry, prose, film, and
readings in psychological theory.
ENG650
The Empire Writes Back
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

In this course our concern will be the literature of postcolonialism (all that’s written
after the colonizing force has gone home). In his poem “Conqueror,” W.S. Merwin frames many
of our questions, albeit without that mark of punctuation: “when they start to use your
language/ do they say what you say/ who are they in your words/ …do you know who is praying/
for you not to be there.” In addition to taking up the questions we hear Merwin asking—What
does it feel like to be the conquered? the one in power? How do you know the answers to those
two questions? What happens when the conquerors finally go away? Can they ever leave?—we’ll
also frame our own questions and engage critical theorists to give us a new language to
contain new ideas. Our path through the crowded landscape of writers concerned with
postcolonialist questions will be necessarily circuitous (geographically, temporally)—and
varied when it comes to genre: we’ll read essays, novels, poems, plays, and we’ll take in a
few films that amplify the postcolonial issues we’re exploring. In the Fall term we’ll focus
on literature of post-Independence India, writers from home and abroad (which is which?). In
the Winter term we’ll cast a wider net to include writers from other former British colonies:
the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria. We’ll turn also to Americans’ literary
presence in a postcolonial world. Our writing will span the spectrum: journal work, personal
narrative, critical essay, poetry.
ENG690
Telling True Stories
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course begins with an extended, intensive focus on various forms of expressive
writing. Short nonfiction and fiction readings will serve as models, while the emphasis will
be on the writing process. Turning then to the practice of writing general nonfiction,
students will study contemporary nonfiction writing and develop research and reporting skills
. Frequent, shorter reading assignments will include work by John McPhee, Malcolm Gladwell,
Joan Didion, Gay Talese, David Halberstam, in addition to readings exploring the evolving
debate about nonfiction writing as art, journalism, or both. In addition to contributing
regularly to a course blog and writing numerous short and medium length pieces, students will
plan, research, and write one longer piece of nonfiction focused on a local issue in the
Pioneer Valley which will be sent to an appropriate publi cation for consideration.
ART100
Intro to Studio Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended to be a first experience in the visual arts. It prepares students
for AP Studio Art by introducing the fundamentals of drawing and painting – line, form,
composition, and color – through a variety of assignments involving the still life,
perspective, and interior spaces. A brief survey into 19th and 20th century art is included.
ART201
Photography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course offers an opportunity to investigate the formal elements of both digital and
film photography, while exploring the potential for creative expression and visual narrative.
Students study and experiment with the nomenclature of DSLR cameras and advanced computer
software, as well as film cameras and darkroom printing. Projects take inspiration from great
photographers of the past and present to foster intentionality with design and content. The
course concludes with the assemblage of a digital and printed portfolio.
ART210
Videography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course offers hands-on experience in all aspects of video production, including
direction, acting, camera operation, lighting, sound, and editing. Inspiration is derived
from the history of film/video along with a substantial library of previous student work.
Projects are designed with artistic intent, involving a variety of genres and an emphasis on
formal cinematography and creative expression. Many of the final projects are featured in
Deerfield’s student video festival in the spring.
ART220
Advanced Videography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Videography

This course builds on skills covered in the introductory videography course, while
providing an opportunity for unique collaboration and ambitious independent work under the
tutelage of the instructor.
ART243
Visual Design
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Projects in this course are focused on experiencing the iterative process, which develops a solution gradually by learning from and refining multiple iterations of a design. Students will learn the essential elements and principles of design using a variety of tools, including drawing and building both digital and physical models. An emphasis of the class will be designing and building in 3-D and all projects will conclude with a verbal and written critique.
ART300
Design for Human Impact
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Whether presenting operating instructions, safety information, statistics, advertisements, or legal arguments, design often serves a critical role in guiding-—and responding to—-human needs and behaviors. In this course, students will learn a Design Thinking process that first considers human factors and then provides the critical tools and techniques needed to develop impactful solutions. Students will use Design Thinking, industrial design, experience design, and graphics to solve real-world problems ranging from the merely inconvenient to the truly life-threatening.
ART410
Architectural Design
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Students receive instruction in architectural design, drafting, planning, and materials
and construction methods. Plan, sections and elevation drawings are produced as well as study
and final models. Students will design a range of buildings and spaces, including residential
and civic projects. Studio work is supplemented with readings in the history and theory of
architecture.
ART412
Architectural Drawing
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Drawing is the primary method by which architects communicate their design ideas, but the drawings themselves are frequently overlooked as works of art. Principles and elements of two-dimensional architectural representation are taught using both traditional and digital media. Projects range from drawing traditional architectural views (plan, section and elevation) by hand and with AutoCad to rendering drawings using colored pencils and watercolors.
ART500
AP Art History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Exploring history through works of art offers an approach for understanding our global
community and is an effective way to review significant events from a visual perspective.
From prehistory to the present, artworks are examined in the context of their era’s dominant
ideas, political events, economic factors, and social structure. This approach, guided by the
redesigned AP art history curriculum, examines exemplars of global artistic traditions within
ten content areas. Visual literacy, critical assessment, analytical reading, class
discussions, and written expression will enable students to decode art, learn from it, and
appreciate the extraordinary creativity of people throughout history. The decision to take
the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the instructor.
ART510
AP Studio Art (Photography)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The one-term Photography course is recommended

This course is designed for students who have completed an AP portfolio, and wish to
further pursue a serious interest in photography. Personalized projects, involving
self-selected themes, may be devised by each student. Digital and film cameras, and a variety
of printing processes may be employed. Class field trips will provide an opportunity to
diversify source material. Students may also assist with curating and implementing
exhibitions on campus, featuring work by professional photographers. The assemblage of an art
portfolio, to include as a supplement with college applications, is an option to pursue in
this course. May be taken as 6th course: ART510P-(p/f).
ART510P
AP Studio Art (Photo) (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
The one-term Photography course is recommended

This course is designed for students who have completed an AP portfolio, and wish to
further pursue a serious interest in photography. Personalized projects, involving
self-selected themes, may be devised by each student. Digital and film cameras, and a variety
of printing processes may be employed. Class field trips will provide an opportunity to
diversify source material. Students may also assist with curating and implementing
exhibitions on campus, featuring work by professional photographers. The assemblage of an art
portfolio, to include as a supplement with college applications, is an option to pursue in
this course.
ART520
AP Drawing
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission

This course involves concentrated study in drawing and follows the Advanced Placement
syllabus. scaThe fall begins with a review of fundamental technique and includes design
principles, creative process, historical perspectives and contemporary trends. Each student
is expected to do outside reading and studio work and to prepare an AP portfolio during the
spring term. All students are required to submit the eventual portfolio. Students assume a
photographic lab fee of $60 towards the preparation of their portfolio. The decision to take
the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the instructor.May be taken as 6th
course: ART520P-(p/f)
ART520P
AP Drawing (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission

This course involves concentrated study in drawing and follows the Advanced Placement
syllabus. scaThe fall begins with a review of fundamental technique and includes design
principles, creative process, historical perspectives and contemporary trends. Each student
is expected to do outside reading and studio work and to prepare an AP portfolio during the
spring term. All students are required to submit the eventual portfolio. Students assume a
photographic lab fee of $60 towards the preparation of their portfolio. The decision to take
the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the instructor.
ART530
AP Studio Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission

Similar to AP Drawing, this course also includes work with color, painting, and sculpture
. Students will study contemporary trends in Western Art and participate in field trips to
museums. Students assume a photographic lab fee of $60 towards the preparation of their
portfolio. The decision to take the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the
instructor. May be taken as 6th course: ART530P – (p/f)
ART530P
AP Studio Art (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission

Similar to AP Drawing, this course also includes work with color, painting, and sculpture
. Students will study contemporary trends in Western Art and participate in field trips to
museums. Students assume a photographic lab fee of $60 towards the preparation of their
portfolio. The decision to take the AP exam in May will be made in consultation with the
instructor. May be taken as 6th course: ART530P – (p/f)
ART600
Topics: Post AP Studio Art
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended for the student who desires to pursue visual art beyond the
Advanced Placement studio art syllabus. The major focus is on studio work: drawing, painting
and sculpting in the style of a number of contemporary artists. Students gain a broader
perspective through slide lectures from visiting artists, field trips and films. From
Brunelleschi’s principles of linear perspective, to the palette of Monet’s haystacks, to
Christo’s wrapped coast, students discuss the importance of self-expression, and moments of
inspiration. “All the really good ideas I ever had came to me while I was milking a cow.”
(Grant Wood). May be taken as 6th course: ART600P-(p/f).
ART600P
Topics: Post AP Studio (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended for the student who desires to pursue visual art beyond the
Advanced Placement studio art syllabus. The major focus is on studio work: drawing, painting
and sculpting in the style of a number of contemporary artists. Students gain a broader
perspective through slide lectures from visiting artists, field trips and films. From
Brunelleschi’s principles of linear perspective, to the palette of Monet’s haystacks, to
Christo’s wrapped coast, students discuss the importance of self-expression, and moments of
inspiration. “All the really good ideas I ever had came to me while I was milking a cow.”
(Grant Wood).
ART601
Topics: Post AP Photography
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Studio Art (Photography)

This course is designed for students who have completed an AP portfolio, and wish to
further pursue a serious interest in photography. Personalized projects, involving
self-selected themes, may be devised by each student. Digital and film cameras, and a variety
of printing processes may be employed. Class field trips will provide an opportunity to
diversify source material. Students may also assist with curating and implementing
exhibitions on campus, featuring work by professional photographers. The assemblage of an art
portfolio, to include as a supplement with college applications, is an option to pursue in
this course. May be taken as 6th course: ART610P-(p/f).
ART601P
Topics: Post AP Photo (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Studio Art – Photography

This course is designed for students who have completed an AP portfolio, and wish to
further pursue a serious interest in photography. Personalized projects, involving
self-selected themes, may be devised by each student. Digital and film cameras, and a variety
of printing processes may be employed. Class field trips will provide an opportunity to
diversify source material. Students may also assist with curating and implementing
exhibitions on campus, featuring work by professional photographers. The assemblage of an art
portfolio, to include as a supplement with college applications, is an option to pursue in
this course.
ART700
Topics Tutorial (Post AP)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Drawing/Studio and Topics in Contemporary Art

This advanced course is for students who have exhausted the drawing/painting curriculum
including the AP level and”Topics in Contemporary Art”. Students will pursue a theme and
prepare work for a group show to be installed in the school gallery during late winter term.
May be taken as 6th course: ART700P-(p/f)
ART700P
Topics Tutorial (Post AP)(p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Drawing/Studio and Topics in Contemporary Art

This advanced course is for students who have exhausted the drawing/painting curriculum
including the AP level and”Topics in Contemporary Art”. Students will pursue a theme and
prepare work for a group show to be installed in the school gallery during late winter term.
DAN100
Intro to Dance
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended to be a first experience in dance. Elementary level boys and
girls study a variety of dance forms such as contemporary, modern, jazz, ballet and hip-hop.
This course also addresses the creative aspect of making dances through improvisation and
choreography. There is an emphasis on injury prevention for athletes. Students who sign up
for this course are encouraged to continue into Dance I winter and spring terms. May be taken
as 6th course: DA100P-(p/f)
DAN100P
Intro to Dance (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended to be a first experience in dance. Elementary level boys and
girls study a variety of dance forms such as contemporary, modern, jazz, ballet and hip-hop.
This course also addresses the creative aspect of making dances through improvisation and
choreography. There is an emphasis on injury prevention for athletes. Students who sign up
for this course are encouraged to continue into Dance I winter and spring terms.
DAN200
Dance I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended to be a continuation of the material covered in the introductory
level dance class offered fall term. However, all elementary level students may sign up for
this course either for one (winter only), or two terms (winter & spring). Students enrolled
in this course may have the opportunity to perform in school dance concerts. May be taken as
6th course: DAN200P-(p/f).
DAN200P
Dance I (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended to be a continuation of the material covered in the introductory
level dance class offered fall term. However, all elementary level students may sign up for
this course either for one (winter only), or two terms (winter & spring). Students enrolled
in this course may have the opportunity to perform in school dance concerts.
DAN300
Dance II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This intermediate level course continues the study of the dance techniques and
choreography covered in Dance I. Students enrolled in this course may perform in and
choreograph for dance concerts each term. They also have the opportunity to work with a
professional choreographer for the Spring Dance Concert. This course may be taken for the
full year, or as a two term class in the winter and spring. May be taken as 6th course:
DAN300P-(p/f)
DAN300P
Dance II (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This intermediate level course continues the study of the dance techniques and
choreography covered in Dance I. Students enrolled in this course may perform in and
choreograph for dance concerts each term. They also have the opportunity to work with a
professional choreographer for the Spring Dance Concert. This course may be taken for the
full year, or as a two term class in the winter and spring.
DAN400
Dance III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is geared towards the serious student of dance and is designed to meet
individual needs. Upper level intermediate dancers will train in a variety of techniques
including contemporary, modern, jazz, ballet and hip-hop. They’ll have the opportunity to
choreograph a dance collaboratively for our Student Choreography Showcase in the winter, and
rehearse a dance with a professional choreographer for our Spring Dance Concert. Students can
sign up either the full year, or two terms (winter & spring).May be taken as 6th course:
DAN400P-(p/f).
DAN400P
Dance III (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is geared towards the serious student of dance and is designed to meet
individual needs. Upper level intermediate dancers will train in a variety of techniques
including contemporary, modern, jazz, ballet and hip-hop. They’ll have the opportunity to
choreograph a dance collaboratively for our Student Choreography Showcase in the winter, and
rehearse a dance with a professional choreographer for our Spring Dance Concert. Students can
sign up either the full year, or two terms (winter & spring).
DAN500
Adv. Dance Ensemble
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is appropriate for dancers who are proficient in the techniques offered
through the program. Advanced dancers explore the craft of group choreography as well as the
art of the solo. Student work is showcased in all of our dance concerts, and there are also
opportunities to work with guest choreographers throughout the year. May be taken as 6th
course: DAN500P-(p/f).
DAN500P
Adv. Dance Ensemble (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is appropriate for dancers who are proficient in the techniques offered
through the program. Advanced dancers explore the craft of group choreography as well as the
art of the solo. Student work is showcased in all of our dance concerts, and there are also
opportunities to work with guest choreographers throughout the year.
DAN600
Advanced Dance Tutorial
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Adv. Dance Ensemble

This class is tailored to meet the individual needs of the pre-professional dancer.
Students work closely with the dance faculty to hone their technique, and create solo and
group choreography for our performances. May also be taken as 6th course: DAN600P-(p/f).
DAN600P
Advanced Dance Tutorial (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Adv. Dance Ensemble

This class is tailored to meet the individual needs of the pre-professional dancer.
Students work closely with the dance faculty to hone their technique, and create solo and
group choreography for our performances.
MUS200
Fundamentals of Music/Studio
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Music can be defined as “organized noise”. Working in the classroom and recording studio
we will listen and analyze music in a whole new way. EDM , Hip Hop, Rap, Rock, Jazz,
Classical, Early Music, and World music will all be discussed. In class presentations,
learning and using terminology will be stressed.
MUS210
Composition: Songwriting
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Working in a recording environment we will listen and analyze music to gain an
understanding of its parts, and compositional devices. Using this information we will compose
music, starting with the basics and moving towards a complete song or instrumental
composition
MUS220
Studio/Production
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

How is today’s music put together? What path does music take from the time it leaves the
creator untill it arrives in your ear . Working in the recording studio, we will learn all
aspects of production. Starting with pre-production, then recording, then editing, then
mixing. Students will need to do much of the homework in the studio itself.
MUS300
Chorus – Joy in Singing
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended to explore range and resonance possibilities for the voice. It is
open to those who have had prior vocal experience, but also available to those who are only
beginning to initiate themselves into the world of singing. Tuning, harmonizing, and
part-singing is included in the curriculum, as well as technical attention to good breath
support and body alignment. A further goal is to develop independence in deciphering a
printed musical score and learning to sing from sight. The ultimate goal is to become both a
both a better singer and musician, and to experience beautiful music in communal harmony. The
ultimate goal is to become both a better singer and musician and to experience beautiful
music in communal harmony. Students may sign up for a full year of study, or take the course
on a term by term basis. May be taken as 6th course: MUS300P-(p/f).
MUS300P
Chorus – Joy in Singing (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is intended to explore range and resonance possibilities for the voice. It is
open to those who have had prior vocal experience, but also available to those who are only
beginning to initiate themselves into the world of singing. Tuning, harmonizing, and
part-singing is included in the curriculum, as well as technical attention to good breath
support and body alignment. A further goal is to develop independence in deciphering a
printed musical score and learning to sing from sight. The ultimate goal is to become both a
both a better singer and musician, and to experience beautiful music in communal harmony. The
ultimate goal is to become both a better singer and musician and to experience beautiful
music in communal harmony. Students may sign up for a full year of study, or take the course
on a term by term basis.
MUS310
Bands: Wind/Rock/Jazz
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course provides an opportunity for experienced woodwind, brass, and percussion
players to collaborate in a variety of ensemble settings including concert band, woodwind
chamber groups, brass ensembles, saxophone ensembles, percussion groups, and jazz/rock bands.
Ensemble assignments are made by the course instructor, and additional ensemble coaches are
drawn from the applied teaching staff. Students work on improving their blend, technique,
intonation, musicianship, ensemble playing, and improvisational skills. May be taken as 6th
course: MUS310P-(p/f).
MUS310P
Bands: Wind/Rock/Jazz (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course provides an opportunity for experienced woodwind, brass, and percussion
players to collaborate in a variety of ensemble settings including concert band, woodwind
chamber groups, brass ensembles, saxophone ensembles, percussion groups, and jazz/rock bands.
Ensemble assignments are made by the course instructor, and additional ensemble coaches are
drawn from the applied teaching staff. Students work on improving their blend, technique,
intonation, musicianship, ensemble playing, and improvisational skills.
MUS320
Chamber Music
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course provides opportunities for instrumental musicians to collaborate, rehearse,
and perform in a variety of ensemble settings. Ensemble assignments are made by the course
instructor, and additional ensemble coaches are drawn from the applied teaching staff.
Students regularly coach each other in a uniquely collaborative seminar format, exploring
questions of performance practice, technique, history, theory, and performance psychology
while studying great works of chamber music literature. This course is open by audition to
string players (violin, viola, violoncello, and contrabass), pianists, and wind players who
demonstrate sufficient proficiency to play repertoire for chamber ensemble. May be taken as
6th course: MUS320P – (p/f).
MUS320P
Chamber Music (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course provides opportunities for instrumental musicians to collaborate, rehearse,
and perform in a variety of ensemble settings. Ensemble assignments are made by the course
instructor, and additional ensemble coaches are drawn from the applied teaching staff.
Students regularly coach each other in a uniquely collaborative seminar format, exploring
questions of performance practice, technique, history, theory, and performance psychology
while studying great works of chamber music literature. This course is open by audition to
string players (violin, viola, violoncello, and contrabass), pianists, and wind players who
demonstrate sufficient proficiency to play repertoire for chamber ensemble.
MUS500
AP Music Theory
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Music is a language: this course examines and develops skill in using that language.
Following a brief introduction to the rudiments of notation (clefs, pitch, and rhythm), most
of the year is spent exploring structure and organization in music (tonality, meter, form,
and the four elements), and mastering idioms that convey meaning. Class and homework time is
divided between written work, ear training, and composition. Written work includes
counterpoint and figured bass realization. Aural skills are developed through regular melodic
and 4-part harmonic dictation, and through sight-singing. Composition offers opportunities
for students to apply their theoretical knowledge, to practice creating and developing
musical ideas, and to experiment with expressing themselves in this abstract language.
Students who do well in this course will be prepared to take the Music Theory AP examination
in May.
THE200
Acting I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course explores the basic principles of acting including ensemble building,
improvisation, voice, movement, textual analysis and theater vocabulary. Class assignments
include writing and performing monologues and presenting scenes and projects. Students also
explore various texts from classical to contemporary. NO PREVIOUS ACTING EXPERIENCE IS
NECESSARY. May be taken as 6th course: THE200P-(p/f).
THE200P
Acting I (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course explores the basic principles of acting including ensemble building,
improvisation, voice, movement, textual analysis and theater vocabulary. Class assignments
include writing and performing monologues and presenting scenes and projects. Students also
explore various texts from classical to contemporary. NO PREVIOUS ACTING EXPERIENCE IS
NECESSARY.
THE300
Acting II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course follows Acting I (although preferable, it is not necessary to take Acting I
prior to this class) and is an in-depth study of the actor’s craft. Students explore more
challenging texts and continue to develop their ability to analyze and perform more complex
characters. Ensemble work continues to be the foundation of this class and students will
continue to strengthen their voice, movement and interpretive skills. Students will also have
the opportunity to study plays and theater practitioners from around the world. NO PREVIOUS
ACTING EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. May be taken as 6th course: THE300P-(p/f).
THE300P
Acting II (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course follows Acting I (although preferable, it is not necessary to take Acting I
prior to this class) and is an in-depth study of the actor’s craft.Students explore more
challenging texts and continue to develop their ability to analyze and perform more complex
characters. Ensemble work continues to be the foundation of this class and students will
continue to strengthen their voice, movement and interpretive skills. Students will also have
the opportunity to study plays and theater practitioners from around the world. NO PREVIOUS
ACTING EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY.
THE408
Speak the Speech
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The works of William Shakespeare are meant to be spoken aloud, not just read
independently, so in this class, we will build an ensemble focusing on understanding
Shakespearean text towards the goal of performance. The class will begin with independent
pieces of text, including sonnets, soliloquies, and scenes. Term 2 will focus on a single
specific text. As a class, we will discuss and decide on a concept for the play, examining
the historical, social, and political contexts of the text and how different concepts would
contribute to all aspects of production. We will work towards performance-ready scenes,
wherein all actors will have the opportunity to engage with a substantive role and sharpen
skills in textual deconstruction, character development, scene study, movement, and use of
language. Although the class is highly performance-based, no acting experience is required.
May be taken as 6th course: THE408P-(p/f).
THE408P
Speak the Speech (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The works of William Shakespeare are meant to be spoken aloud, not just read
independently, so in this class, we will build an ensemble focusing on understanding
Shakespearean text towards the goal of performance. The class will begin with independent
pieces of text, including sonnets, soliloquies, and scenes. Term 2 will focus on a single
specific text. As a class, we will discuss and decide on a concept for the play, examining
the historical, social, and political contexts of the text and how different concepts would
contribute to all aspects of production. We will work towards performance-ready scenes,
wherein all actors will have the opportunity to engage with a substantive role and sharpen
skills in textual deconstruction, character development, scene study, movement, and use of
language. Although the class is highly performance-based, no acting experience is required.
THE500
Act/Directing for Production
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Acting I or Acting II

After completing Acting I and II, committed and experienced acting students are
encouraged to progress to a more advanced study of acting. Students are encouraged to
contribute to the development of a creative ensemble as well as develop their
self-sufficiency as actors. In addition to learning advanced acting techniques, a major
performance project is presented at the end of the term. May be taken as 6th course:
THE500P-(p/f).
THE500P
Act/Directing for Prod (p/f)
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Acting I or Acting II

After completing Acting I and II, committed and experienced acting students are
encouraged to progress to a more advanced study of acting. Students are encouraged to
contribute to the development of a creative ensemble as well as develop their
self-sufficiency as actors. In addition to learning advanced acting techniques, a major
performance project is presented at the end of the term.
HEA200
Health Issues
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course examines topics related to human sexuality, alcohol and other drugs, stress
management and general adolescent development. Through classroom presentations and
discussions, students will study a variety of issues, which are especially pertinent to their
own personal awareness and development.
HIS200
Topics in Western Civilization
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course examines major themes and episodes in the development of Near-Eastern,
Mediterranean, and European societies from antiquity to the French Revolution. Using a
diverse selection of historical and literary texts to highlight the tensions, ideas, and key
events that have shaped our world, the course also provides students with a foundation of
core skills, including source analysis, research methods, historical interpretation, and
analytical writing. Topics include the wars, politics, and ideas of Ancient Greece and Rome,
the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, and the influence of
religion, in particular Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, on societies and cultures.
HIS210
Africa and Latin America
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course uses literature, along with a rich variety of historical sources including
documents and films, to study cultural and political developments in Africa and Latin America
. The course explores how the forces of conquest, colonization and commerce have shaped the
lives of individuals and communities on these continents. We also focus on the process of
upheaval and change associated with decolonization, independence and revolution in these
regions. Along with being interdisciplinary, texts rely heavily upon indigenous voices and
focus on a range of countries including Nigeria, Kenya, the Congo, South Africa, Mexico, El
Salvador, Brazil and Cuba. The course is designed to build each student’s foundation in key
historical skills including active reading, argumentative writing and inquiry-based research.
HIS220
Asia in World History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course serves both as an introduction for students who have never studied Asian
history and as a means, for those with foundational background, to further explore the
societies, politics and belief systems of India, China and the Middle East. While students
focus primarily on one of the three regional civilizations each term, they also trace the
complex web of commercial and cultural exchange paths that crossed Asia and stretched to
Europe, Africa, and Oceania. Along the way, they inquire into the relationship between these
early pathways and modern global ones. Secondary source texts provide scaffolding for the
course, but we also read from primary spiritual texts like the Bhagavad Gita, the Confucian
Analects and the Qur’an, as well as from early travelogues, histories and manuals on ruling
and warfare. Throughout the year, students develop and hone skills in active reading and
viewing (of film and still images), discussion and debate, historical research, and the
presentation of oral, multi-media and written arguments.
HIS230
Big History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Where did everything come from? How did we get where we are now? Where do humans fit in?
Where are things heading? These are questions that origin stories from different cultures
have addressed for thousands of years. This course explores the modern scientific origin
story of how the universe and life within it has grown more complex over the last 13.7
billion years. This tale, itself thousands of years in the making, has been woven together by
a wide spectrum of scientists and historians. Together, students will engage powerful ideas
and common themes across the entire time scale of history, from the Big Bang and creation of
star systems to the emergence of the Earth’s first microorganisms and the recent rise of
human societies. The course juggles huge objects such as galaxies with tiny ones such as
atoms, while it examines both events that took a billionth of a second and stories that span
billions of years. Because Big History relies upon content, concepts and texts drawn from
many disciplines, students will need to carefully weigh how scholars develop and justify
their claims about the past, and how, over time, new claims serve to refute or refine earlier
ones. Students will also have the opportunity to create their own narratives, explanations
and arguments in response to Big History’s essential questions.
HIS400
United States History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This survey course charts the emergence of modern America through a study of its past.
More than a purely political and chronological review, the course also examines social,
economic and cultural aspects of our heritage. In addition to the basal textbook, the course
uses many primary documents, interpretive secondary sources, guest lectures, and multimedia
technology. Careful attention is given to the development of historical skills, from research
and writing to the conceptualization of individual historical interpretations. This course is
required of all juniors not enrolled in American Studies or Honors United States History.
HIS500
AP Seminar: Global H20
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry

Clean water is essential for the living world and the global economy, but in many areas
the supply of uncontaminated water is in danger of disappearing. In this AP Seminar course
students explore the environmental, social and economic issues associated with the worldwide
struggle to acquire clean water. As part of the AP Capstone Program of the College Board, the
AP Seminar course challenges students to guide their own inquiry process as they learn to ask
good research questions, understand and analyze arguments, evaluate multiple perspectives,
synthesize ideas, collaborate effectively, communicate persuasively using written and oral
expression, and reflect on their learning and skill development. AP Seminar: Global H2O
Resources is an interdisciplinary course designed to foster inquiry, global awareness,
scholarship and creativity. Students examine the a viability and use of clean water at local,
national, and global levels by means of investigative case studies, debates, independent and
collaborative projects, chemistry lab work, and field trips to local sites. Students who take
AP Seminar are eligible to pursue a capstone project during senior year in the AP Research
course. May also be taken as Science: SCI500.
HIS501
AP Seminar Global Food Systems
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

In this AP Seminar course students explore the complexity of global food systems while
developing their skills as critical thinkers and global citizens. The course will focus on
local and global issues related to agriculture and food production, nutrition and culture,
and hunger and food insecurity. As part of the AP Capstone Program, the AP Seminar course
challenges students to guide their own inquiry process as they learn to ask good research
questions, understand and analyze arguments, evaluate multiple perspectives, synthesize ideas
, collaborate effectively, communicate persuasively using written and oral expression, and
reflect on their learning and skill development. Throughout this interdisciplinary course,
students will deepen their understanding of food systems through debates, seminar discussions
, independent research, collaborative projects, oral p resentations, visual essays, guest
speakers, chemistry lab work, and field trips to local farms and food producers. Students
will take advantage of pioneer valley’s rich agricultural heritage, Deerfield Academy’s award
winning dining hall, and other contacts in the valley and around the world as they seek out
and analyze divergent perspectives about food systems and their environmental, economic,
cultural, and health impacts. Students will be challenged to move from ideas to action as
they analyze systems, identify problems and propose solutions related to food around the
globe and on their plates. May be taken as Science: SCI501.
HIS503
His: American Studies
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This is an interdisciplinary course combining honors-level U.S. history and American
literature. The course fulfills both the junior English and history requirements, and
prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in American history. Students examine the
social, economic, political, and cultural heritage of the United States through a combination
of primary documents, interpretive secondary sources, and representative works of American
literature and art. Close, critical analysis, responsible oral discourse and expository
writing are emphasized. American Studies is team-taught and meets for a double period.
HIS513
Honors United States History
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This honors course goes beyond the U.S. History survey to approximate introductory
college course work in the field. The primary difference, however, is in degree and not kind
as students read a wider range of historical materials, especially primary sources from the
eras under consideration. Interpretive investigations and projects include both oral and
written assignments, and required term papers. Students in this course are expected to take
the AP examination in May.
HIS600
American Empire
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

At the dawn of the 21st century, the United States is a superpower without rival, an
immensely powerful, wealthy country whose influence stretches to every corner of the world.
This course charts the path that America has followed to gain this lofty global position,
from the early 19th century to the present day—a multi-faceted story that is political and
social, military and cultural, environmental and technological, national and international.
This history of triumphant struggles and bitter setbacks is about ideas too, so students also
study the champions and opponents of America’s imperial ascent. Because the idea of an
American empire is itself controversial, this course offers a comparison to some of history’s
other great empires in order to see what is distinctive about America’s imperial project.
This course also considers the internal and external challenges facing the United States in
the 21st century, a time when much anxiety exists about the future of the American empire.
HIS607
Modern Europe, 1870-1945
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course surveys the history of Europe from the confidence and splendor of the late
nineteenth-century to the material and moral ruin of the mid twentieth century. We examine
modern Europe’s glories as well as its divisions and failure to solve internal problems that
twice brought it to the brink of self-destruction. Social, economic and cultural history are
integrated within a framework of political narrative. Special attention is given to
late-nineteenth-century imperialism, the modernism of the Belle Epoque, the Great War, the
rise of Fascism, the Spanish Civil War, the Second World War, and the Holocaust. Film,
literature and memoir are used extensively to understand, interpret and evaluate the human
experience of the era. The course stresses critical thinking and discussion skills, and
activities include debates, roundtables and simulations. Stu dents also acquire an up-to-date
grounding in information literacy and research skills that will serve them well in college
and beyond. Open to juniors and seniors. [This course is offered every other year, and
alternates with Postwar Europe: History, Film and Literature since 1945.]
HIS610
Modern Times:20th C. World His
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Dynamic, violent, and unpredictable, the past fifty years have been tumultuous—a time of
wonder and tragedy, of great breakthroughs and disastrous breakdowns. This course examines
important ideas of the past one hundred years, but concentrates mainly upon the major
developments, discoveries, trends, and tensions of the post-1945 period. The course may
address issues ranging from total war and its impact on thought and culture, the Cold War and
the collapse of communism, decolonization and nationalism in developing countries, genocide
and human rights, technological change, emerging environmental challenges, the impact of the
September 11 attacks, and the financial crash of 2008.
HIS620
India and China: 2.5B & Change
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The world is changing at an astonishing pace, and India and China, with their high
economic growth rates and combined populations of more than 2.5 billion, contribute
significantly to that change. This interdisciplinary, topics-based course draws upon the
socio-political, economic, environmental and demographic histories of India and China not
only to better understand the impact of change on the two nations, but also to clarify the
degree to which our fates in the global landscape are bound to theirs. Topics include
controversial international policies (free trade, decisions regarding war and peace),
resource management (water, oil, coal) and history’s largest human migrations. Texts range
from scholarly journal publications to the morning’s Wall Street Journal. Students learn and
teach through discussion, debate, small group problem-solving exercises and position papers.
They complete the course with an analytical research project on a relevant topic of their
choice.
HIS640
Economics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission

In the first half of the year students are introduced to microeconomic theory through the
study of such concepts as supply and demand, the law of diminishing returns, marginal utility
and the theory of the firm and industry. The second half of the year focuses on macroeconomic
analysis and its historic development from Keynes to Friedman. Such concepts as national
income analysis and monetary and fiscal policy are covered in depth. We also focus on public
policy and current political/economic issues through the use of case studies and supplemental
readings.
HIS690
Hist. Research: Memory & Myth
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Our understanding of the past not only influences our policies for the future, but shapes
our identity. Yet that understanding is often flawed and rooted in myth, leading to
disastrous consequences. Using source material that ranges from the writings of historians to
films in popular culture, students examine how and why humans have interpreted and
reinterpreted the past, and the consequences of those interpretations for nations and
individuals alike. Topics may include the meaning and memory of the American Civil War, one
or two of the totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century, the Vietnam War, and the recent
financial crash of 2008. Such case studies aim not only to develop the historical
sensibilities of students, but also the skills of research and writing to prepare students
for the second half of the course, during which students select a topic of inquiry, formulate
and revise a question, conduct extended independent research, and write a research paper.
ARA100
Arabic I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is an introduction to the Arabic language and Arabic-speaking cultures. With
an emphasis on developing communicative skills and solid grammatical structures, students
will work with a variety of media to master the alphabet, basic reading and writing skills,
and develop listening and speaking skills in the Modern Standard Arabic and the Levantine
dialect. Students learn the basic linguistic structures of the Semitic Language family and an
appreciation of Arabic calligraphy art.Students in this class will have the use of iPads
through which they submit a variety of homework assignments. Learning mediums include iPad
apps, interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true pen and paper.
Much of the content is introduced through homework and then honed and molded in the following
class through activities and speaking experience. Class is conducted mostly in Arabic with
some English when needed.
ARA103
Arabic I Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Students in Accelerated Arabic are expected to advance through material at a more
rigorous pace following the same format outlined in Arabic 100.
ARA200
Arabic II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic I or the equivalent

This course builds upon skills developed in the first year of Arabic and follows a
similar format of course delivery, homework variations and a blended instruction format. The
emphasis on developing communicative skills and solid grammatical structures continues as
students work to master their communicative skills in the Modern Standard Arabic and the
Levantine dialect.Students in this class will have the use of iPads through which they submit
a variety of homework assignments. Learning mediums include apps, interactive websites,
videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true pen and paper. This class is conducted in
Arabic.
ARA203
Arabic II – Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic I Accelerated or the equivalent

Students in Accelerated Arabic II are expected to advance through material at a more
rigorous pace following the same format outlined in Arabic 200.
ARA300
Arabic III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic II or the equivalent

This course builds upon skills developed in Arabic 200, and it follows a similar format
of course delivery, homework variations and a blended mode of instruction. Intermediate level
communicative skills and detailed grammatical structures continue as students work to master
skills in the Modern Standard Arabic and the Levantine dialect. Students in this class will
have the use of iPads through which they submit a variety of homework assignments. Learning
mediums include apps, interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true
pen and paper. This class is conducted in Arabic.
ARA400
Arabic IV
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic III or the equivalent

At this level of Arabic, students continue developing language skills through authentic
texts and literature in Modern Standard Arabic. Grammar is integrated through classroom
discussions and activities. In Arabic IV, students continue expanding vocabulary, improving
listening comprehension and developing advanced communication skills in both the Levantine
and Egyptian dialects of Arabic. Students in this class will have the use of iPads through
which they submit a variety of homework assignments. Learning mediums include apps,
interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true pen and paper. This
class is conducted in Arabic.
ARA403
Arabic IV – Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic III Accelerated or the equivalent

Students in Accelerated Arabic IV are expected to advance through material at a more
rigorous pace following the same format outlined in Arabic 400.
ARA500
Arabic V
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic IV or the equivalent

At this level of Arabic, students continue developing language skills through authentic
texts and literature in Modern Standard Arabic. Grammar is integrated through classroom
discussions and activities. In Arabic IV, students continue expanding vocabulary, improving
listening comprehension and developing advanced communication skills in both the Levantine
and Egyptian dialects of Arabic. Students in this class will have the use of iPads through
which they submit a variety of homework assignments. Learning mediums include apps,
interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true pen and paper. This
class is conducted in Arabic.
ARA503
Arabic V – Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Arabic IV Accelerated or the equivalent

This class focuses on the individual student’s stated goals and objectives as it
continues to develop language skills through authentic texts and literature in Modern
Standard Arabic. Grammar is integrated through classroom discussions and activities. In
Accelerated Arabic IV, students continue to expand vocabulary and develop advanced
communication skills in the dialects of choice. Students in this class will have the use of
iPads through which they submit a variety of homework assignments. Learning mediums include
apps, interactive websites, videos, recordings, as well as the tried and true pen and paper.
This class is conducted in Arabic.
ARAONL1
Intro to Arabic-ESA Online
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The Eight School Association offers an Introduction to Arabic course. It is a team-taught
pilot online class that integrates synchronous and asynchronous web tools in teaching and
learning. Students work with a variety of online media to master the Arabic alphabet and
sounds, build vocabulary, acquire basic grammar skills, and read and comprehend Modern
Standard Arabic. Students will learn how to speak about themselves, their families and their
environment, to maintain basic conversations, and to compose paragraphs. This course focuses
on Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to Levantine colloquial through music, songs, and
short videos. By the end of this course, students will have both a solid command of basic
linguistic structures and skills, in addition to a further understanding and appreciation of
Arab culture and Art. Students’ progress is assesse d through performance on weekly
assignments and projects. This year-long course is open to 10th, 11th, and 12th grade
students, with permission of the department and is worth the equivalent of one term of credit
from the ESA. As such, it does not count as one of five required courses, nor does it satisfy
the Deerfield language diploma requirement.
CHI100
Chinese I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is an introduction to Chinese through exposure to listening, speaking,
reading, and writing. Students learn Pinyin Romanization and simplified characters. The
course emphasis is on oral proficiency as well as mastery of basic grammar structure. Oral
proficiency is developed through the use of communication activities, including class
discussion, role-playing, group projects, and presentations. Class work is supplemented by
various technology tools and online resources.
CHI200
Chinese II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chinese I or the equivalent

This course is a continuation of Chinese I skills: speaking, listening, reading, and
writing. In addition, the course includes an in-depth study of grammar. Students strive for
accuracy while focusing on the ability to communicate in varied contexts and with proper
grammar. Class work is supplemented by various technology tools and online resources. Class
is conducted in Chinese.
CHI300
Chinese III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chinese II or the equivalent

This intermediate level course continues to develop proficiency in Chinese, emphasizing
self-expression through classroom discussions, compositions, communication activities, and
reading a variety of short stories. Students undertake a complete review of grammatical
structures. Class is conducted in Chinese and supplemented by various technology tools,
online resources, and other cultural materials.
CHI400
Chinese IV
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chinese III or the equivalent

This course aims to develop competency in advanced Chinese with an emphasis on fluency of
spoken language, reading, and writing. A variety of authentic materials is used to give
students a deeper knowledge of Chinese language, culture, history, and social issues. However
, a systematic study of Chinese vocabulary and grammar will continue to be emphasized and
practiced through the use of the textbook. Students in this class are introduced to the
format and material of the Chinese AP Language Examination. Class is conducted in Chinese.
CHI500
Chinese V
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chinese IV or the equivalent

This course is for students with a high degree of proficiency in oral and written Chinese
who wish to pursue Chinese at an advanced level. Students explore a variety of texts and
materials in literature, history, social issues, culture, art, and music. Students are
encouraged to read and write critically. Independent study and research are also encouraged.
Class is conducted in Chinese.
CHI699
Chinese Tutorial
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission

This advanced course is a modern Chinese literature and writing class for students who
love to read and write. Students explore a variety of readings and practice a wide range of
writing styles in order to analyze and develop effective skills for literary analysis and
appreciation. Narrative fiction, films, poetry, and critical essays are included. Students
are expected to take an active part in class discussion. In addition, culture and history
will be an integral part of this course. Class is conducted in Chinese.
CLA201
The Greek New Testament
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This is a two-term course that presents the narrative and theology of Christianity and
introduces students both to the emerging canonical texts in their linguistic and historical
dimension, and to non-canonical sources (Josephus, for example, and the Apocrypha). The
course will focus on the central figures of Jesus and Paul and will use select critical
passages, words and ideas to introduce to and engage students in analysis of etymology and
word choice, enhancing and enriching their understanding. Our course will first introduce the
ideas and political structures present in the Jewish and Greco-Roman world in the early
centuries before the Common Era, in an attempt to contextualize the environment in which a
Christ was both sought after and found. We will then focus on the 1st century of the Common
Era, which included the life of Jesus of Nazareth, the missionary journeys of Paul, a
Hellenic Christian convert from Judaism, and the decisive fall of Jerusalem to the Romans
many decades later. Finally, we will examine how interpretations and translation of the Greek
New Testament resulted in the cacophony of Christian expression in the second millennium in
the Common Era. May also be taken as Religion: REL201.
CLA450
Classics Smnr: Achilles Heal
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

In this course we will investigate how texts well over two thousand years old give us
insight in to the plight of a modern day combat veteran as well as how classical literature
about warfare presents the opportunity for constructive dialog with modern day combat
veterans and their families. We will look at Homer¹s Iliad, two plays by Sophocles, one play
by Euripides and the seminal work of Jonathan Shay, Achilles in Vietnam. We will invite
combat veterans into the classroom as well as discuss the themes of our work with other
outside professionals who are actively engaged in the work of promoting dialog with veterans
and their families using these very same texts. There are no prerequisites for this class as
all texts will be read in English. This class is required for all students seeking to fulfill
the requirements of the Classics Scholar Program and become eligible for the Classics Prize.
FRE100
French I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is an introduction to French through exposure to listening, speaking, reading
, and writing. The course uses an aural-oral approach, which stresses oral proficiency as
well as mastery of basic grammar. Various resources include access to an online text,
technology sites (Edmodo, Voicethread, iBooksAuthor), and frequent filming of skits, songs,
and dialogues. Class is conducted in French.
FRE200
French II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French I or the equivalent

This course is focused on a continuation of the skills learned in French I through
exposure to listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course uses an aural-oral approach
with stresses oral proficiency as well as continuing the study of grammar. Various resources
include access to an online text, technology sites (Edmodo, Voicthread, iBooksAuthor), and
frequent filming of skits, songs, and dialogues. Class is conducted in French.
FRE203
French II Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French I, instructor permission, & curr teacher
approval

This accelerated intermediate level course is for students with a high degree of
aural-oral proficiency. In addition to an in-depth study of grammar, students develop
conversation skills and read a variety of short literary works from France and the
Francophone world. Language applications such as Voicethread, Explain Everything, Notability,
iBooks Author, and Book Creator will be used to enhance both written and oral production.
Class is conducted in French. As with all honors classes at Deerfield, the honors courses
require a substantial and consistent work ethic in order to master the material in a
satisfactory manner.
FRE300
French III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French II or the equivalent

This intermediate level course uses a grammatical and thematically structured curriculum,
including a variety of readings. Using iPads, work in and out of the classroom is
supplemented by software and online resources such as Book Creator, Voicethread, Explain
Everything, YouTube, Prezi, and PowerPoint. In the course of the year, students will read
literary texts such as Le Petit Prince. Emphasis is on oral and written expression. Class is
conducted in French.
FRE303
French III Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French II, instructor permission, & curr teacher
approval

This accelerated third year course emphasizes discussion and composition. A thorough
review of grammar is conducted. Students study the 19th century and read a variety of texts
by 19th-century authors. Technology sites such as Edmodo, Collaborizeclassroom, Voicethread,
iBooksAuthor, and filming of discussions and skits supplement class work. Class is conducted
in French. As with all honors classes at Deerfield, the honors courses require a substantial
and consistent work ethic in order to master the material in a satisfactory manner.
FRE400
French IV
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French III or the equivalent

This course is for students who would like to pursue the study of French at a more
advanced level. Students review the fundamentals of grammar and continue to develop oral
proficiency. Technology sites such as Edmodo, Collaborizeclassroom, Voicethread, iBooksAuthor
, and filming of discussions and skits supplement class work. Students study the history of
certain periods in order to place the literature they read and read a variety of works by
writers from France and the Francophone world. Class is conducted in French.
FRE503
French IV Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French III, instructor permission, & curr teacher
approval

This accelerated course emphasizes oral proficiency, composition, and literary and oral
analysis. Students will read a variety of genres from the Francophone world. This class will
also examine French history through various films. Students are introduced to the structure
of the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture Examination. Class is conducted in
French. As with all honors classes at Deerfield, the honors courses require a substantial and
consistent work ethic in order to master the material in a satisfactory manner.
FRE510
French V
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French IV or the equivalent

This is a literature seminar that continues to emphasize grammar and composition in order
to polish students’ writing skills. Students read works by a variety of authors from France
and the Francophone world. Oral presentations, debates and discussions are also used to
continue developing oral competency. Class is conducted in French.
FRE603
French V Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French IV, instructor permission, & curr teacher
approval

This accelerated course emphasizes oral proficiency, composition, and literary and oral
analysis. Students will read a variety of genres from the Francophone world. This class will
also examine French history through various films. This course prepares students for the
Advanced Placement French Language and Culture Examination. As with all honors classes at
Deerfield, the honors courses require a substantial and consistent work ethic in order to
master the material in a satisfactory manner.
FRE700
French VI
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French V

Building on the French V curriculum, this course offers an emphasis on writing and
speaking while developing further reading proficiency of Francophone modern texts. Relevant
films and documentaries are integrated in this course to further examine the history and
culture of the French-speaking world at large, giving a visual context to the readings. Class
is conducted in French.
FRE703
French VI Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
French V, instructor permission, & curr teacher
approval

This is a topics-based course for advanced speakers of French who have finished French
V-Honors. The course is especially designed for those students who wish to continue their
French studies at the college level. Readings explore a wide variety of topics such as issues
of contemporary France and the European Union. Open to students with permission of the
instructor. This course may not be offered every year. As with all honors classes at
Deerfield, the honors courses require a substantial and consistent work ethic in order to
master the material in a satisfactory manner.
GRE100
Greek I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This introduction to ancient Greek is offered to experienced language students who wish
to try something old and different. The goal is to learn to read ancient Greek as quickly as
possible. The pace, content, and texts are matched to the interests and experience of the
students in the class. Offered when three or more students request it, this course is open to
seniors, juniors, and, with permission of the instructor, sophomores.
GRE200
Greek II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is a continuation of Greek I, offering a review of and advance in the
fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax for qualified students. In the fall and winter terms
, students gradually engage more consistently with extended readings of authentic Ancient
Greek from the Greek literary canon. As a culmination of the course in the spring, students
will enroll in the Classics spring elective in which students engage in literary genres in
translation that are integral to the Classical tradition.
LAT100
Latin I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The beginning course in Latin aims to provide students with the fundamental skills and
content necessary for the ongoing study of the Latin language and Classical history and
culture. The curriculum covers the elementary concepts of the language as well as the history
, cultures and geography of the Italian peninsula.
LAT200
Latin II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Latin I or equivalent

The continuation of the introductory Latin sequence, this course covers more complex
syntax and prepares students to read authentic Latin literature by the spring term. Readings
include passages from authors such as Augustus, Julius Caesar, Catullus and Suetonius.
History and culture topics focus on the development of the city of Rome and the spread of
Roman power and influence from the Early Republic to the Late Empire.
LAT300
Latin III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Latin II or equivalent

In conjunction with a systematic review of fundamentals, students engage in selected
readings of both prose and poetry. After a variety of readings in the fall, students progress
to Cicero’s ‘Somnium Scipionis’ in the winter and selections from the ‘Amores’ and
‘Metamorphoses’ of Ovid in the spring. Readings are utilized to consolidate and expand
knowledge of Latin and to increase understanding of Roman history and culture between the end
of the 2nd Punic War and the death of Augustus. The requisite grammatical material for
students who intend to take the College Board SAT II test in Latin will have been covered in
this course.
LAT500
Latin IV
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Latin III or the equivalent

This literature course provides an in depth study of the Roman national epic poem of the
age of Augustus. Through a close reading of extensive portions of the Latin text of the
Aeneid students expand their skill at reading Latin and enlarge their knowledge about the
life and history of the ancient Romans. The course covers the syllabus for AP Latin: Vergil
exam and familiarizes students with the nature of that test so that they may, if they wish,
sit for the exam in May.
LAT600
Latin V
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Latin IV or the equivalent

This advanced course in the literature of the late Republic and early Empire asks
students to apply the skills developed/acquired in previous courses as they read more deeply
and produce more concrete analysis in both class discussions and in writing. This particular
period was one of tremendous ferment in which literary experimentation and creative
adaptation were hallmarks of the Roman cultural achievement. This achievement went hand in
hand with the political turmoil that resulted in the establishment of the principate and an
age of peace and stability known as the Pax Romana. Students will engage with a given genre
or genres and cultivate the ability to approach ancient texts critically in light of their
understanding of the historical and political context of this period. Classroom discussions
go beyond the translation of texts to explore the implicat ions of not only the thematic
content but also the style of the texts we read.
LAT699
Advanced Tutorial
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission

Advanced Tutorial may be offered to students who, in consultation with the department and
with its endorsement, wish to pursue an individualized course in classical studies.
SPA100
Spanish I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course is an introduction to Spanish, and it presents basic grammar and vocabulary.
Students develop their skills using text, video, and audio materials. Class is conducted in
Spanish. Open to all students; juniors and seniors need permission of the Academic Dean.
SPA200
Spanish II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish I or the equivalent

This extension of the student’s work in beginning Spanish includes an in depth study of
Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Class is conducted in Spanish.
SPA300
Spanish III
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish II or the equivalent

This course continues to develop the four basic skills: speaking, listening, reading and
writing. Students study short literary works, write compositions, review basic grammar and
investigate a variety of cultural topics. The emphasis is on developing conversational
proficiency while reinforcing proper grammatical usage. Class is conducted in Spanish.
SPA303
Spanish III Honors
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
minimum 90% in Spanish II

This course is for students able to pursue Spanish at a more comprehensive level and
faster pace than those of Spanish III. In comparison to the Spanish III course, greater
emphasis is placed on oral work in class, the grammar review is more sophisticated, and
literary skills are more aggressively developed. Class is conducted in Spanish. With
permission of the instructor, the more successful students may move from this course to the
advanced courses, skipping Spanish IV.
SPA400
Spanish IV
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish III or the equivalent

This course continues to develop proficiency in Spanish through study and practice in
conversation, composition and reading. Through the study of Latin American and Spanish
literature and history, students improve critical reading, writing skills, cultural awareness
and grammatical precision. Class is conducted in Spanish.
SPA402
Spanish IV – Community Service
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish III or III-H

This course follows the readings and curriculum in the regular Spanish IV course but adds
a community service component. Students will teach Spanish to third and fourth graders from
Deerfield Elementary every other Wednesday during the seventy-minute period. Open to students
who have finished Spanish III or III-H at Deerfield and who wish to serve the community while
continuing with their Spanish studies. Interested students should simply sign up as a first
choice. Only 12 will be selected and those not selected will be automatically placed in
Spanish IV. This course is a full academic year commitment. Speaking with Dr. Invernizzi
about your interest before signing up typically increases the student´s chance of being
selected. You will leave this course ready to teach Spanish or English (both as a second
language) to children anywhere in the world. You will possess the tools and experience to
make your class fun, exciting and productive. Excellent if you plan on summer jobs that
require these skills.
SPA500
Spanish V
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Spanish IV or equivalent

In this course students continue to develop oral and written proficiency in Spanish
through the study of the history, culture, and literature of contemporary Spain. By analyzing
literary texts, periodicals, and film of twentieth and twenty-first century Spain, students
expand their vocabulary and develop more sophisticated language skills. Students are
introduced to the format and material of the Spanish AP Language Examination, but they are
neither required nor expected to take it. Class is conducted in Spanish.
SPA603
Honors Latin Amer. Literature
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Instructor permission

This course is divided into three distinct terms. In the fall we explore Latin American
literature from its beginnings starting with pre-Columbian texts such as the Popol Vuh. Odd
and even years will read different texts yet they will all come from the Conquest and the
Colonial era. Winter term takes us to attempt longer and more contemporary texts. Some works
read may be One Hundred Years of Solitude or Leafstorm by García Márquez. In the spring,
though we typically begin with some short stories by such greats as Borges, Cortázar and
María Luisa Bombal, we also delve into the world of film. This is an honors-level, year-long
course and seniors may not drop in the spring.
MAT101
Algebra I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This is a course in first year algebra with emphasis on such topics as the properties of
the real number system, solving first degree sentences in one variable, the fundamental
operations involving polynomial and rational expressions, systems of linear equations in two
variables, fractions, factoring, ratio, proportion, variation, exponents, roots, quadratic
equations, and problem solving. All of the material of a typical first year of algebra will
be completed as well as a variety of enrichment topics.
MAT102
Algebra I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This is designed for a student who has already studied some or much of the material that
is covered in a typical first year algebra program, but who would benefit from additional
work with the topics of Algebra I. The fall term is devoted to a review of the basic skills
and ideas of Real Numbers, followed by single-variable equations and inequalities which then
leads to work with linear relations and their applications in the late fall and winter.
Students end the winter with the study of quadratic relations and their applications, and
then spend the spring term on introductions to exponential relations, probability and
statistics, and the idea of functions.
MAT201
Geometry
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Math 101/102 or the equivalent

This course is designed for students who would benefit from significant reinforcement of
topics from Algebra I as they pertain to geometric problems. The emphasis in this course is
on recognizing the geometric relationships in shapes and solids. New concepts are introduced
using inductive reasoning and exploration. Students who complete this course will be prepared
for a 300-level course.
MAT202
Geometry
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT102 or the equivalent

This course integrates material from both plane and solid geometry. However, the
development of the material requires extensive use of the skills and concepts already studied
in algebra. The major emphasis is the study of the properties of two and three dimensional
geometric figures from both a deductive and inductive reasoning approach. Additional topics
include material from analytic geometry, exercises in logic, the graphing of functions and
relations and elementary trigonometry. Students who complete this course will be prepared for
a 300-level course.
MAT203
Honors Geometry
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Outstanding ability in MAT101/102 or the
equivalent

This is an enriched version of Math 202 and is designed for the well-qualified math
student. The course covers the same geometric topics as Math 202 but in greater depth.
Students investigate additional topics at the discretion of the instructor. Successful
completion of this course normally advances a student to Math 303.
MAT301
Algebra II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT101/102 and MAT202/203

This course meets the standards of a solid course in second year algebra. However, it is
designed for students whose background indicates a need for a review of material from
previous courses. As such it moves at a somewhat slower pace than Math 302. Students who
complete this course are prepared for a 400-level mathematics course.
MAT302
Algebra II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT202/203 and MAT302/303

This course is intended for students who have achieved success in Math 102 and Math 202
or the equivalent. The material is developed with an emphasis on the functional approach and
most topics include a range of applied problems. The main focus of the course is the
analytical development of the linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic
functions. Other topics developed include an analysis of both the real and complex number
systems, systems of equations in two and three variables, and an introduction to
trigonometric functions. Students may take a 200-level and this 300-level course concurrently
. Students who complete this course are prepared for a 400-level mathematics course.
MAT303
Honors Algebra II
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT202/203 and MAT302/303

This is an enriched version of Math 302 and is designed for the well-qualified student.
The course develops the same material as Math 302 but in greater depth. Students in this
class are frequently asked to solve non-routine problems and to apply familiar concepts in
new problem situations. Students may take a 200-level and this 300-level course concurrently.
Successful completion of this course normally advances a student to Math 403.
MAT401
Functions, Statistics & Trig.
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT301/302 or the equivalent

This is intended as a follow-up to Algebra II or an equivalent course. It is designed to
complete the study of the elementary functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic,
and trigonometric). Additionally, the course will develop some material from finite
mathematics including an introduction to probability and statistics. While the topics cover a
wide range of mathematics the course does not include the rigor of a precalculus course, and
the pace allows for a review of some concepts from Algebra II. Throughout the entire course
modeling of real phenomena is emphasized. A Deerfield Academy laptop is required.
MAT402
Precalculus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT302 or the equivalent

This is a follow up to Math 302 and as such continues the development of functions and
relations. The course includes a thorough study of polynomial, rational, exponential,
logarithmic and trigonometric functions, an analytical development of conic sections, polar
equations and graphs, matrices, and an introduction to data analysis. Calculator based
graphing technology is incorporated into the course, and the instructional approach is
greatly influenced by the fact that all students have immediate access to this technology.
MAT403
Honors Precalculus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT303 or the equivalent

This is designed as a continuation of Math 303. The topics covered in this accelerated
course include all those listed under Math 402 but the pace is such that the material will be
completed by the end of the winter term. Successful completion of this course normally
advances a student to Math 603 (AP Calculus BC).
MAT450
Discrete Math. & Precalculus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT401 or the equivalent

This course follows Math 401. It is also intended for students who have completed 402 and
who do not wish to study calculus at this time. This course provides a continued emphasis on
the development of functions and relations, including a thorough study of polynomial,
rational, exponential, logarithmic, and power functions. Further, data analysis and
difference equations are used to model real world phenomena. Calculator and computer based
graphing technology are incorporated into the course.
MAT501
Calculus
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Math 502 and/or Math 402 or the equivalent

This course offers an introduction to the derivative and the integral. The pace of this
course allows for a review of precalculus topics when necessary.
MAT502
AP Calculus AB
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT402 or the equivalent

This course follows the Advanced Placement AB syllabus, which incorporates an
introduction to the derivative and the integral and their applications. Students in this
course are required to take the AP exam in May.
MAT503
AP Calculus BC
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT 403 or the equivalent

This course follows the Advanced Placement BC syllabus, which incorporates an
introduction to the derivative and the integral with their applications and work in infinite
series. This four-term course, which begins in the spring term of the sophomore or junior
year, is for students who are outstanding in mathematics. Open to students who have completed
Math 403 or the equivalent, with permission of the department. Exceptional mathematics
students entering Deerfield in the fall term with demonstrated excellence in precalculus may
consult the mathematics chair as to placement in the fall. Students in this course are
required to take the AP exam in May.
MAT503A
AP Calculus BC – Spr term
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT502 or the equivalent

This course follows the Advanced Placement BC syllabus, which incorporates an
introduction to the derivative and the integral with their applications and work in infinite
series. This four-term course, which begins in the spring term of the sophomore or junior
year, is for students who are outstanding in mathematics. Open to students who have completed
Math 502 or the equivalent, with permission of the department. Exceptional mathematics
students entering Deerfield in the fall term with demonstrated excellence in precalculus may
consult the mathematics chair as to placement in the fall. Students in this course are
required to take the AP exam in May.
MAT510
AP Statistics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Math 302 or 303 with permission, or Math 401 or
402

This course follows the Advanced Placement Statistics syllabus, which introduces students
to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.
Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data by observing patterns
and departures from patterns, planning a study by deciding what and how to measure,
anticipating patterns by producing models using probability and simulation, and studying
statistical inference by confirming models. May be taken concurrently with a 400-level or
higher course. Students in this course are required to take the AP exam in May.
MAT600
Adv Calc & Diff Equations
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT502/503 or the equivalent

This course is for outstanding mathematics students. The content includes work on
multivariable calculus, vector calculus, optimization problems, the calculus of fields, and
ordinary differential equations, both linear and non-linear. Mathematica, the symbolic
mathematics software, is used extensively in the course for displaying 3-D graphs, performing
advanced numerical analysis, and analyzing non-linear differential equations and systems of
such equations. A licensed copy of the software is provided to all students.
MAT700
Adv. Mathematics Tutorial
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT600 or the equivalent

On an individual basis, further study in mathematics may be pursued. Topics vary from
year to year, depending on the interests of the faculty and the students, but may include
proof writing, number theory, probability, statistics, linear algebra, abstract algebra,
advanced differential equations, special functions and complex function theory. Graphics
calculators may be required.
MAT800
Independent Study in Math
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
MAT700 and department permission

Topics not covered in MAT700 will be pursued as agreed upon by the interest of the
student and instructor.
PHI200
Ethics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

What is “the good life?” How do you define “right” and “wrong”? What do you do when
confronted with an important decision that pits”right vs. right”? Students explore and
sharpen their own moral reasoning as they investigate the strengths and weaknesses of major
ethical theories. The class grapples with the ideas of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle,
Mill, Kant, Bentham, and Hobbes. Class discussions focus on the applications of theories to
ethical issues and personal stories. Assessment includes analytical writing and independent
research projects.
PHI300
Eastern Philosophy
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

“The more you know, the less you understand.” Lao Tzu. Together we will explore the
incredibly rich landscape of Eastern philosophy. While deceptively simple, our texts
invariably lead to meaningful self-discovery and insights about the world. The students will
be asked to consider the significance and relevance of these perspectives. Can they help us
navigate our own lives? Have they subtly influenced western thought when we were not looking?
Along with the classic texts of Western interpretation, we will consider works such as Zen in
the Art of Archery, Tao Te Ching, What the Buddha Taught, and The Analects of Confucius.
PHI400
Political Philosophy
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Should there be a government? If so, what should be its responsibilities? What should be
the extent of its authority? This course explores classic and contemporary debates in
political philosophy. The students undertake a rigorous and critical examination of classic
texts on issues such as leadership, justice, civil disobedience, human rights, and social
contract theory. Texts by influential political theorists (including Sophocles, Plato, Locke,
Marx, Nietzsche, Rawls) supplement a discussion of present day issues. Lively class
discussions and independent research projects help students develop their ability to merge
politics and philosophy.
REL201
The Greek New Testament
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This is a two-term course that presents the narrative and theology of Christianity and
introduces students both to the emerging canonical texts in their linguistic and historical
dimension, and to non-canonical sources (Josephus, for example, and the Apocrypha). The
course will focus on the central figures of Jesus and Paul and will use select critical
passages, words and ideas to introduce to and engage students in analysis of etymology and
word choice, enhancing and enriching their understanding. Our course will first introduce the
ideas and political structures present in the Jewish and Greco-Roman world in the early
centuries before the Common Era, in an attempt to contextualize the environment in which a
Christ was both sought after and found. We will then focus on the 1st century of the Common
Era, which included the life of Jesus of Nazareth, the missionary journeys of Paul, a
Hellenic Christian convert from Judaism, and the decisive fall of Jerusalem to the Romans
many decades later. Finally, we will examine how interpretations and translation of the Greek
New Testament resulted in the cacophony of Christian expression in the second millennium in
the Common Era.May also be taken as Classics: CLA201.
REL300
Native America
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

“My friend, I am going to tell you the story of my life.” With these words, Black Elk
retrospectively compounds deeply experienced Native sorrow with a profound reverence for all
life, in whatever form and color it may come. It is true that Native people inhabited the
Americas well before the “white man” arrived from Europe on large ships in the 16th century.
The contributions of Native cultures are inextricably tied to the American story, and few
regions are as ripe for inquiry in this regard as Deerfield. This course begins to tell the
story of Native peoples through their history, their spirituality and their present lives on
reservations. Particular attention will be given to the Native populations that consider the
land of their people to be in the New England states and southeastern Canadian provinces.
During the fall long weekend in October students will be invited to participate in a
multi-day off-campus cultural immersion experience in Kahnawake, Quebec, as guests of the
Mohawk community.
REL301
Islam and the Qur’an
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This course encounters the Qur’an in an effort to introduce foundational concepts of
Islam, Islamic theology, modern Islamic societies and theocracies, and the diverse ways in
which Muslims practice their religion. Muhammad, may peace be upon him, and the Qur’anic
revelation, will be the foci of this course, along with the historical and contemporary ummah
, the Islamic community, that both follows his teachings and honors his efforts. With
periodic interdisciplinary gatherings attended by both students in this class and in Arabic I
, while taught by teachers from the Foreign Language Department and the Philosophy and
Religious Studies Department, particular attention will be given to classical Arabic language
and etymology, enriching students’ understanding of pivotal Islamic ideas. Students will gain
an understanding of the historical setting in whic h the Qur’an was first revealed and how
subsequent generations made sense of the scripture. The curriculum and conversations will
also lend useful tips on how to read and better understand Islamic scripture. Ultimately,
through attention to the diversity of Islam as a complex and evolving civilization, the
course is designed to help students navigate through the Qur’an on their own and to speak
accurately and confidently about Islam.
REL400
Religions of the World
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

The course begins with an examination and analysis of religious questions in the broadest
sense. What is religion? What does religion attempt to explain? How can one be a “successful”
adherent to this tradition? Students then survey major world religions: Hinduism, Jainism,
Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Class discussion and independent reading focus on
the great books of these religions in an attempt to discover both the common and the unique
elements.
ANA401
Anatomy & Physiology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Biology

This course is a study of the structure and function of major systems of the human body.
Lectures, laboratory work (including dissection), research papers, special projects and
presentations offer students an exciting look at the relationship between anatomy and
physiology.
AST401
The Physics of the Cosmos
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This introductory astronomy and physics course explores what our universe or Cosmos is,
the rules that govern the matter within, where it came from and the means by which we observe
it. The course will consist of both traditional classroom meetings as well as evening
observations using the school’s various telescopes. Students will explore the dynamics of our
local neighborhood of star and planets while also venturing outside our solar system to
explore other star systems, galaxies and exotic objects such as black holes. The scope of the
course is broad but will primarily explore physics in the context of the universe as a whole
and it’s role in our daily lives. May also be taken as Physics: PHY401
AST600
Astrophysics Research
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Phy 1A or AP B excellence,BC Calc enrollment,or
permission

This is a three-term research course in which student teams conduct a year-long
investigation in astrophysics or cosmology. Astrophysics is an effort to understand how
everything in the universe works, from black holes to galaxies. Cosmology is a study of the
nature of the universe itself that addresses questions like, “How did the universe begin?”
and “What is the ultimate fate of the universe?” This course will begin with a survey of many
fascinating topics in astrophysics and cosmology. This survey will serve to spark interests
and questions students may like to pursue through research. Students will then work in groups
using quantitative research methods to investigate questions of interest to the group using
existing data. Examples of potential projects include modeling exploding stars (supernovae)
that can briefly outshine entire galaxies, and u sing galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to
study the first galaxies to form in the universe over 13 billion years ago. Students in this
course will develop skills that will serve them in a variety of career paths, including
research methods, critical analysis of other’s research, effective collaboration, and how to
communicate one’s work accessibly. Students will leave this course with a better
understanding of the field of astronomical research generally, as well as an in-depth
understanding of their chosen topics and those of other groups.
BIO400
Biology I-Survey of Biology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry

Biology I is a survey course encompassing all of organismal biology. It includes: the
origin, history and evolution of life, the chemical basis of life, the mechanisms of genetic
inheritance, gene regulation, cell and tissue functions, biological diversity, plant and
animal anatomy & physiology, homeostasis, ecology, and behavioral biology. Emphasis is on the
defining concepts of biology, including structure and function, the characteristics of life,
the symbiotic interactions of species in communities & between a species and its environment,
the mutability of species, variation in populations, universal constraints to diversity such
as surface area to volume ratios and historical contingency, the place of humans as a species
, and the potential for life on other worlds. The course further emphasizes group and project
work, laboratory experiences, and case based approaches to units.
BIO403
Biology I Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry

This single period class is intended for students with a high proficiency in chemistry.
Biology IA is a comprehensive introductory survey of biology. The themes of molecular biology
, cell biology, genetics, anatomy, ecology and evolution provide the conceptual framework of
the course. Students are encouraged to take the SAT II subject test upon completion.
BIO500
AP Biology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry

Advanced Placement Biology is a demanding college-level course designed for students with
high aptitude and strong interest in science. The underlying principles of evolution, cell
biology, genetics and systems interactions are developed in depth in accordance with the
course syllabus issued by the College Board for Fall 2012. Emphasis is placed on
inquiry-based laboratory activities and student-centered projects that complement the
lectures and discussions. Students are expected to take the AP Biology examination upon
completion of the course.
BIO600
Orthopaedic Biomechanics
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Biology & instructor permission
Excellence in science
This course is designed to involve students in all aspects of orthopaedic research,
including literature searches, critical reading, experimental protocol design, experiment
execution, computer modeling, data collection, data analysis, and multimedia project
presentations. Delving into the overlap between engineering and anatomy, students work in
small teams based on common interests, sharing daily workload and developing their own
specialties within the group. Topics to-date have included bruise mechanics, modeling Medial
Tibial Stress Syndrome, meta-analyses of child abuse symptoms, studies of intimate partner
violence cases both present and historical, arthropod exoskeleton mechanics, and general
functional anatomy. Course expectations are for students to work collaboratively in teams,
generate weekly progress reports, manuscript production, and often in collaboration with
professionals outside Deerfield. This course requires team work outside of standard class
hours.
BIO620
Experimental Neurology
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Biology and instructor permission

From a conceptual perspective, Experimental Neurology will study cell physiology,
neurotransmitter biochemistry and neuroanatomy. Experimentally, students will explore
signaling in cockroach neurons. Students will construct microelectronic circuit boards
allowing for cell-to-cell signals to be measured from short-lasting voltage spikes in which
the electrical membrane potential of a cell rapidly rises and falls; indicative of an action
potential. Furthermore, short-term cell cultures will be initiated for purposes of studying
cellular structure. Imaging and photography of cell cultures will be used to understand
function from structure.
CHE300
Chemistry I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Physics I/IA or department permission

This course enables students to develop an understanding of the fundamental properties of
matter that provides the foundation for the development of quantitative models of chemical
systems. Laboratory work, guided inquiry learning, group discussion and lecture are
integrated into most aspects of the year’s work. Students who do very well in this course may
elect to take the SAT II Chemistry test at the end of the year.
CHE303
Chemistry I Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Physics or concurrent Algebra II or H Geometry

The course is intended for students with high aptitude for science and math. Chemistry I
Accelerated emphasizes inquiry learning through the development of problem solving and
laboratory skills. Students are encouraged to take the SAT II Chemistry test upon the
completion of this course. The exceptional student who is considering ChemIA might
alternatively consider enrolling in AP Chemistry.
CHE500
AP Chemistry
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Concurrent or completed Honors Algebra II

This is a chemistry course for students with strong interest in science and exceptional
quantitative skills. Meeting daily over double periods, the course meticulously covers the AP
lecture syllabus and laboratory syllabus. Students are expected to take the AP exam upon
completion of this course.
COM300
Intro to Java Programming
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

In this two-term course, students with little to no computer programming experience will
learn to code in the Java programming language. Students will also learn algorithmic thinking
, data structures, and program design. This is a self-pace, hands-on course, and students
learn to program by working both individually and in small teams. Students learn conditional
statements, loops, arrays, and dictionaries, as well as more advanced topics as they are
ready to move on; and are introduced to a development framework consisting of three main
areas: conceptualization, explanation, and implementation. Modular, function-based
programming is stressed, and students learn to develop high-quality applications using
well-designed collections and algorithms.
COM500
AP Computer Science
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Concurrent Honors Precalculus or instructor
permission

This is a course for students who have a serious interest in studying computer science.
In this course students learn an object-oriented approach to programming, with the emphasis
being on problem solving, algorithm development, and data structures. The course is demanding
and requires significant work out of class. Students are expected to take the AP Computer
Science A exam upon completion of this course.
COM600
Advanced Computer Science
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
AP Computer Science

This course follows AP Computer Science. Students study advanced topics including lists
and trees, computer design, real world processing and problem solving with robotics. Students
learn electronics and how to create function, interactive autonomous devices. Topics vary
somewhat from year to year and student interests can help shape projects and areas of study.
PHY200
Physics I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This is an introductory physics course. Through guided inquiry, group discussion, and
hands on investigations students will come to a functional understanding of the principles of
physics. We study phenomena including mechanics, electricity and magnetism, optics and others
. Students create their own experiments, test their ideas, engineer and build their own
structures and communicate their ideas to others. This course focuses on the concepts,
principles, and ways of thinking that will underlie students’ further study of science.
PHY203
Physics I Accelerated
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Algebra I

This is an introductory physics course with an emphasis on data collection and analysis.
Through guided inquiry, group discussions, and hands on investigations students will come to
a functional understanding of the principles of physics. Students will investigate phenomena
from the major themes of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, optics and others. Students
will create their own experiments and be pushed to uncover, explain and extend patterns and
principles in nature. This will be done through extensive use of computer-based data
acquisition and analysis.
PHY401
The Physics of the Cosmos
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

This introductory astronomy and physics course explores what our universe or Cosmos is,
the rules that govern the matter within, where it came from and the means by which we observe
it. The course will consist of both traditional classroom meetings as well as evening
observations using the school’s various telescopes. Students will explore the dynamics of our
local neighborhood of star and planets while also venturing outside our solar system to
explore other star systems, galaxies and exotic objects such as black holes. The scope of the
course is broad but will primarily explore physics in the context of the universe as a whole
and it’s role in our daily lives. May also be taken as Astronomy: AST401
PHY402
Physics II: EV Engineering
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Physics

Throughout the fall and winter terms, students in this class will convert a 6-wheeled
amphibious utility vehicle to run on electrical power. This course offers students a unique
opportunity both to problem solve practical designs and to bring their ideas to fruition
through the hands-on construction and implementation of their ideas. Students will be
assessed on their ability to collaborate effectively and to demonstrate independence,
resilience and time management. Additionally, students will study topics including gear
ratios, thermodynamics, oxidation/reduction/electrochemistry, internal battery resistance, DC
motors, fuses, switches, motor controllers, variable resistors, and rolling resistance.
PHY500
AP Physics I
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Algebra II

This course is intended for students with a strong aptitude for science and a keen
interest in the physical world. The introductory physics syllabus is covered in depth and at
a rapid pace. Major topics include mechanics, the study of motion and forces, energy and
momentum; electricity and magnetism; geometric optics, waves and light. An advanced-level
textbook is used, and emphasis is placed on the development of problem-solving skills.
Students will be prepared to take the SAT II Physics Test upon completion of the course.
Students are expected to take the AP Physics B exam.
PHY501
Advanced EV Engineering
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Electric Vehicle Engineering

Advanced Electric Vehicle Engineering is a two-trimester course offered to students who
have demonstrated a keen interest and proficiency in Physics II: EV Engineering. This course
will be offered to those who have already completed the conversion of a vehicle from an
internal combustion engine to an electric motor. Students will measure the efficiency of the
vehicle and make necessary modifications to maximize, torque, velocity, runtime and
maneuverability. Possible areas of concentration include, but are not limited to: solar power
, efficiency and effectiveness of tracks vs. wheels, testing gear ratios to determine maximum
velocity vs. torque capabilities, and efficiency and effectiveness of charging options.
PHY550
AP Physics C
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Past or current Calculus BC and first year
physics

This is a second year course for students who have a serious interest in studying physics
beyond the introductory level. The AP syllabus is followed as the major themes of physics are
studied in detail through lecture, laboratory and demonstration. This course regularly uses
double periods, and the out of class work can be extensive and demanding. Students are
expected to take the AP Physics examination.
PHY600
Physics II: Exp Design/Robots
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Precalculus

This course is rooted in the idea that people learn best when actively engaged in
projects that are sustained, personally meaningful, and enjoyable. Through both research and
engineering design students learn the fundamentals of experimental design, data collection
and analysis. Students will work in teams to solve problems of common interest. Topics in the
past have included ballistics optimization, robotics, renewable energy assessment, and
computational simulations of complex systems.
SCI500
AP Seminar: Global H20
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Sophomores may be eligible with permission of the
instructor

Clean water is essential for the living world and the global economy, but in many areas
the supply of uncontaminated water is in danger of disappearing. In this AP Seminar course
students explore the environmental, social and economic issues associated with the worldwide
struggle to acquire clean water. As part of the AP Capstone Program of the College Board, the
AP Seminar course challenges students to guide their own inquiry process as they learn to ask
good research questions, understand and analyze arguments, evaluate multiple perspectives,
synthesize ideas, collaborate effectively, communicate persuasively using written and oral
expression, and reflect on their learning and skill development. AP Seminar: Global H2O
Resources is an interdisciplinary course designed to foster inquiry, global awareness,
scholarship and creativity. Students examine the a viability and use of clean water at local,
national, and global levels by means of investigative case studies, debates, independent and
collaborative projects, chemistry lab work, and field trips to local sites. Students who take
AP Seminar are eligible to pursue a capstone project during senior year in the AP Research
course. May also be taken as History: HIS500.
SCI501
AP Seminar Global Food Systems
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

In this AP Seminar course students explore the complexity of global food systems while
developing their skills as critical thinkers and global citizens. The course will focus on
local and global issues related to agriculture and food production, nutrition and culture,
and hunger and food insecurity. As part of the AP Capstone Program, the AP Seminar course
challenges students to guide their own inquiry process as they learn to ask good research
questions, understand and analyze arguments, evaluate multiple perspectives, synthesize ideas
, collaborate effectively, communicate persuasively using written and oral expression, and
reflect on their learning and skill development. Throughout this interdisciplinary course,
students will deepen their understanding of food systems through debates, seminar discussions
, independent research, collaborative projects, oral p resentations, visual essays, guest
speakers, chemistry lab work, and field trips to local farms and food producers. Students
will take advantage of pioneer valley’s rich agricultural heritage, Deerfield Academy’s award
winning dining hall, and other contacts in the valley and around the world as they seek out
and analyze divergent perspectives about food systems and their environmental, economic,
cultural, and health impacts. Students will be challenged to move from ideas to action as
they analyze systems, identify problems and propose solutions related to food around the
globe and on their plates. May be taken as History: HIS501
SCI510
AP Environmental Science
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP
Chemistry or department permission

Advanced Placement Environmental Science is a challenging double-period course designed
for students with a strong interest in environmental issues. The central theme of global
sustainability is developed through lectures and debates and specific topics are explored by
means of case studies, laboratory activities and field trips to local sites. The material is
multi-disciplinary in nature and students are encouraged to draw upon a wide range of
academic resources, including readings in sociology, ethics, economics, law and ecology.
Students are expected to take the AP Environmental Science examination.
SCI601
Design for Living
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

n this course students explore the interactions between plants and humans to design
better indoor living environments. Using the research skills learned in the AP Seminar course
, students investigate the biological, chemical, and technological issues of remediating
indoor environmental toxins using symbiotic living systems. Students research and design
automated systems that use plants to remove chemical pollutants from the environment to
create both functional and beautiful living spaces. The course culminates with an Academic
Paper written and defended for AP credit and possible publication.
SCIONL1
Water and Humanity-ESA Online
9
10
11
12
FWS
FW
F
WS
W
S
Elective
NCAA
AP

Water and Humanity examines the dynamic relationship between water and human development.
Exploring water from a multidisciplinary, project-driven perspective, students will think
critically about the central role water has played and must continue to play in the viability
of all civilizations. Students will engage in innovative project planning to consider,
understand, and propose solutions to complex water issues. Using blended methodology
involving online videoconferencing and learning, face-to-face conversations and lessons, as
well as field research, this course will focus on the value of water and on the issues that
water scarcity presents within the contexts religious belief and practice, the human-w ater
relationship in fine art and architecture, national and imperial infrastructure, and
industrial development. Students will also think about the place of water in their own local,
regional, and global communities, while researching and proposing their own solutions to
complex water issues – culminating in a comprehensive Capstone project. Students will enjoy
the advantages of this online and interdisciplinary platform, which enables them to engage in
dialogue and collaboration across the Eight Schools Association, with the goal of furthering
thinking and conclusions about water’s central dilemmas.